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Full text of "A treatise on lace-making, embroidery, and needle-work with Irish flax threads"

PRIZE 



W&> 1 SE^S. 

' -A TREATISE ON 

LACE MAKING. EMBf\01DEF\Y 
•AND NEEDLEWORK qo 



it** 



IRISH FLAX 
THREADS. 




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Published by 

Tfil fiARBOU^ BROTHERS (ortPAfiY 



Book N9.3 



1694 



Price JO Cents 



BARBOUR'S IRISH FI<AX THREADS 

Received Highest Awards at the World's Fair, 1893. 



f^ tiiH 




\MaryAnn $> eitieme 
(DecorativicArf 
QoutSionj 



STEALING 
AND FRAN CINE 

CLA1UC 
ART INSTITUTE 
L1BRART 



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EXHIBIT OF BARBOUR'S IRISH LiNEN THREADS 
IN MANUFACTURES BUILDING. 



SPECIAL MERITS. 

Qbapfai& ttibu } ^D u Kahili \$, 



BOOK NO. 3, 



BARBOUR'S 



PRIZE NEEDLE-WORK SERIES 



A TREATISE 



LACE-MAKING, EMBROIDERY, AND NEEDLE-WORK 




PUBLISHED BY 

THE BARBOUR BROTHERS COMPANY. 

1S94. 



Copyright, 1894, 

BY 

THE BARBOUR BROTHERS COMPANY. 



press or 

ftockfrrell antt CfturdjiU 

BOSTON 



CONTENTS. 



PAGE 

INTRODUCTION 5 

RULES 7 

AWARD OF PRIZES ... 9 



Lace 



DEPARTMENT 1: 
Linen Counterpane 
and Insertion) . . . 

Spider Lace 

Leaf and Shell Lace 
Diamond Lace Flounce . 

Link Lace 

Paul Revere Roses . . 
Pansy Lace ..... 
Fuchsia-Vine and Passion 

Leaf Lace 

Arlington Lace . . . 

Vesta Lace 

Hazeltine Lace .... 



15 

17 
18 
20 
24 

25 
27 

30 
32 
34 
36 



DEPARTMENT 2: 

Mitts 38 

Turkish Slippers .... 39 

Tennis Belt .41 

Picot Point Doily . . . , 42 
Rose Tidy and Chair-Arm 

Coyer , 44 

Macrame Fringe . ... 47 
Drapery Chains and Shade- 
Pull 49 

Rose-Spray Applique ... 51 

Ribbed House Slippers . . 53 

Reins, for Children ... 54 

Dress Voke 56 

Sofa-Pillow 58 



PAGE 

DEPARTMENT 3: 

Parasol Coyer 61 

Baby's Cap 63 

Antique Square .... 64 

Lady's Tie 66 

Macrame Work 67 

Barbour's Patent Lace 

Desk 69 

Macrame Fringe .... 71 

Ulster Fringe 73 

Bobbin Work 73 

Grounds 77 

Diamond Point Edging . . 80 

Copenhagen Lace .... 82 

Spider Insertion .... 84 

DEPARTMENT 4: 

Cross-Stitch for Gingham, 87 

Darned Net Apron ... 88 

Darned Net Drape ... 91 

DEPARTMENT 5: 

Bag in Outline Embroidery, 93 

Buttercup Doily .... 95 

Eglantine Centre-Piece . 97 

DEPARTMENT 6: 

Cent re-Piece in Old Eng- 
lish Point too 

Handkerchief in Princess 

Lace 102 

Hedeboe Lace 104 

Lunch Napkins 105 



BOOKS NO. 1 AND NO. 2 



BOOK OF INSTRUCTION FOR MACRAM^ LACE 

MAKING 

are still in print, and will be sent to any address upon receipt of ten 
cents each. In addition to Patterns for work, they contain general 
directions for Crocheting, Knitting, Antique or Guipure Lace, Darned 
or Embroidered Net, Tatting, Embroidery, and instructions how to 
properly wash Embroidery and Tatting. 



If consumers find difficulty in procuring Barbour's Linen Thread 
from their local stores, it will be sent from The Barbour Brothers 
Company, New York, to any address, postage paid, upon receipt of 
stamps or silver, as follows : 



3-cord, 200-yards spools, dark blue, white, whited 

brown (or ecru) and drabs 10 cents ea. spool. 

3-cord, carpet thread, any color . 

00 Ulster rope linen floss, any color . 

o flax embroidery floss, any color . . 

No. 8, flax embroidery floss, any color 

Crochet thread, balls, gray, cream, and white. 

Nos. 16, 18, 20, and 25 . . . . . . . .15 cents per ball 

Nos. 30, 35, 40, and 50 20 " " " 

Nos. 60 and 70 25 " " " 



5 " " skein. 

5 " " " 

5 " " " 

5 " 2 skeins. 




1784 fCran.v^Rfl 1894 



In presenting Book No. 3 of Barbour's " Prize Needle-Work 
Series," we wish to extend heartfelt thanks to our friends the ladies, 
for the encouragement and sympathy displayed and for assistance 
in preparing this volume. The disastrous fire which occurred in 
Boston March 10, 1893, destroyed the entire exhibit for which three 
thousand dollars had just been awarded as prizes, and from which 
we were to select much of the material for our new book. It was 
our intention to exhibit the art work at Chicago, and it was under- 
stood that when we had completed making selection of designs, and 
after the close of the Columbian Exposition, the articles included in 
the prize exhibit should be returned to their owners. Notice of the 
fire loss was at once sent to all prize winners, with the suggestion 
that further compensation would be rendered in case the prize al- 
ready given was not deemed sufficient remuneration. Expressions of 
sympathy and appreciation came from all, several ladies even offer- 
ing to refund the prize money received, and less than twenty per 
cent, requiring additional compensation. These claims were char- 
acterized by a spirit of fairness and appreciation which rendered the 
settlement of them a pleasure in spite of the great losses already sus- 
tained by the Barbour Brothers Company. For the reasons stated 
above, the publication of Book No. 3 was necessarily delayed, but in 
the spring of the present year the work was again taken up and has 
been prepared with special care, although we have felt most seriously 
the loss of the magnificent designs included in the prize exhibit. It 
has been impossible to have elaborate pieces of work which won first 
and second prizes duplicated, as in some instances it would require 
many months to complete them • hence, in writing the ladies who 
had expressed a readiness to aid in the preparation of the new 



b BARBOUR S PRIZE NEEDLE-WORK SERIES. 

volume, we did not stipulate duplication. Whenever the design of 
the prize article could be reproduced it has been done. For ex- 
ample, the first prize article in Department 6 was a bed-spread with 
shams of darned net, silk lined, literally a work of art. The darned 
net drape in Department 4 of this volume is of the same design. 

We desire to call attention to the chapters on macrame and 
bobbin work, which are not "translations .from the German," but 
prepared especially for this volume by a practical needle-worker, 
who has thoroughly tested the directions given. Though necessarily 
incomplete we trust they will serve to create fresh interest in one 
and new interest in the other, and will be followed in later issues by 
beautiful and elaborate designs from contributors. 

When we consider the amount of labor, time, and patience in- 
volved in the production of a single piece of fine work, the import- 
ance of using the flax threads always, in preference to cotton, cannot 
be over-estimated or too strongly impressed upon our friends. Not 
only is the flax thread easier and pleasanter to work with, and far 
more effective in first results, but it does not suffer in the hands of 
the laundress as does cotton ; and this fact alone, particularly when 
we remember that pieces of fine needle-work so frequently become 
family heirlooms, should be sufficient to. discourage the use of cotton 
threads. Ladies of wide experience in art-work, many of whom are 
connected with the various " Exchanges " for the sale of woman's 
work, understand this thoroughly, and also that the employment of 
cotton detracts so largely from the money-value of laces, that it 
is a waste of time and labor to use it in any instance. In the old 
countries, where lace-making forms the industry of thousands, cotton 
lace is unknown, the flax thread being universally used. It is only 
where cheap machine-made laces obtain that cotton has made head- 
way for such purposes. 

It has been decided to try the experiment of purchasing material 
for Book No. 4, which we expect to issue in due time. This plan, 
while proving an effective stimulus to fresh efforts, we believe will be 
more satisfactory than the method of remuneration through the 
awarding of prizes. 

Allow us again to thank the ladies for their kindness, to ask their 



publisher's notice. 



consideration in behalf of Book No. 3, and to express the hope and 
belief that No. 4 will, with their efficient cooperation, surpass any- 
thing of its class ever before the public. 

RULES. 

We feel sure that the proposition to purchase material for Book 
No. 4 and succeeding volumes of Barbour's " Prize Needle-Work 
Series " will meet the cordial endorsement of all our friends, as it 
has already been approved by some of the participants in the last 
competition, to whom we have submitted this new departure. 

Contributions must consist of sample or samples of work with 
directions carefully written out, and stating exactly the number of 
the thread used, or shade and size of floss, size or number of 
needles, etc., together with the quantity of material required for 
the article in question. Samples of laces knitted, crocheted, and 
tatted, with other work of similar class, should be made from the 
directions after the latter are written, thus insuring correctness. 

It is imperative that all work be done with Barbour's Irish Flax 
Threads. These threads and flosses are provided to meet every 
requirement, and having once used them, we know ladies will ac- 
cept no substitute. It is understood that all directions must be 
absolutely correct. Errors in manuscript will be remedied if 
necessary. We want new and good ideas from our friends every- 
where, upon whose assistance we rely in maintaining the success 
which has attended volumes No. 1 and No. 2. Original work will re- 
ceive special attention. If not original, contributors will kindly 
state from what publication or source their design was obtained. 
The price must be plainly marked upon every article submitted. 
Samples of lace should contain not less than one yard, and the 
quantity of the lace made by a spool or ball of the thread used 
designated. On receipt of the articles they will be carefully ex- 
amined. If accepted, payment will be made without delay, but if 
for any reasons they are not available for the Barbour Brothers 
Company, they will be returned express charges prepaid. Contri- 
butions should be sent to The Barbour Brothers Company, 218 
Church Street, New York, and express charges must be prepaid. 



8 barbour's prize needle-work series. 

Information concerning implements or materials, needles, shuttles, 
bobbins, etc., will be gladly furnished all desiring it, and we hope 
by the time Book No. 4 is issued to have made many new friends 
among needle-workers. 

MARY E. BRADFORD, 

Care of The Barbour Brothers Company, 

218 Church Street, 

New York. 
Address all communications to 

THE BARBOUR BROTHERS COMPANY, 

Needle Work Department, 

218 Church Street, 

New York. 
Sept. i, 1894. 



DEPARTMENTS. 

Department No, 1. — Knitted, crocheted, tatted, and Maltese (or 
hairpin) laces. 

Department No. 2, — Articles in knitted, crocheted, tatted, and 
Maltese work, other than lace, designed for use and ornament, such 
as bedspreads, tidies, toilet-sets, purses, etc. 

Department No. J. — Netted, macrame, and bobbin (or pillow) 
work, such as lace, lambrequins, drapes, parasol-covers, etc. 

Department No. 4. — Articles in Italian, gobelin, cross-stitch, 
flat, and similar embroidery, including darned net. 

Department No. 3. — Articles in cut-work, Kensington, outline, 
Hungarian, and other embroidery of like nature. 

Department No. 6. — Articles in drawn-work, English point, or 
of any description, other than specially noted, in which the Irish 
flax threads are used to advantage. 



REPORT OF BOARD OF LADY JUDGES. 

TO AWARD PRIZES OFFERED IN BOOK NO. 2 OF BAR- 
BOUR'S PRIZE NEEDLE-WORK SERIES FOR WORK MADE 
WITH BARBOUR'S LINEN THREAD. 



Boston, Feb. 17, 1893. 
To the Barbour Brothers Company, Boston Branch, 6j Lincoln Street, Boston, Mass. : 

Permit us herewith to submit our report on the award of prizes offered in No. 2 of 
the Prize Needle-Work Series. Owing to the variety of articles presented, and their gen- 
eral excellence, the rendering of decisions has been a rather difficult duty; in making 
the awards, however, we have endeavored to consider carefully the relative value of 
each piece of work in regard to novelty, use, beauty, and minor details. Some of the 
departments, notably Nos. 1 and 2, were filled to overflowing, while others were less 
abundantly supplied ; hence, when any single article could be properly classified in 
either of two departments, we have placed it under that in which there was more likeli- 
hood that it might win a prize. Some pieces of work were not correctly classified by 
the several ladies entering them ; this was particularly the case in Department No. 10, 
concerning the scope of which a misunderstanding seems to have existed, as articles in 
crochet, netting, tatting, etc., were entered under this head, which properly belonged 
and were, of course, placed in their respective departments. In cases of decided merit, 
also, we have taken the liberty to reclassify articles which, in the department in which 
they were originally entered, could have received only the most honorable mention. 

Without wishing to discriminate, we may be pardoned for making especial reference 
to the display in Department No. 7, wtr'ch can be rarely equalled. Surely, it proved 
conclusively to all present that the needle, threaded with flax embroidery floss, is no 
longer surpassed, even by the artist's brush, as a decorator. Indeed, the varied colors 
were so harmoniously blended as to produce the effect of painting, in many instances. 
While the work throughout was admirable, we especially wish to congratulate those 
ladies who contributed to this department and the one following — the more, since no 
illustration, however nicely executed, can do justice to the artistic beauty of their work. 

In closing, allow us to thank you for the many courtesies extended to us during the 
progress of our really pleasant task, and to express the earnest hope that our work has 
been performed satisfactorily to you and the many ladies whose handiwork was sub- 
mitted in competition for the generous prizes offered. 

ADA M. CHILD, Chairman, 

( Vice-pres. Woman s E. 6° /. Union.) 
SHELLEY HYDE, 
Mrs. E. B. FOX, 
Mrs. HORACE HOWE, 
Mrs. EMMA L. HATTON. 



10 



BARBOUR S PRIZE NEEDLE-WORK SERIES. 



DEPARTMENT NO. i 



First Prize, $50. 

Nettie M. Poole, 2 Bellingham ave., Revere, 

Mass. 

Second Prizes, $25. 
Belle C. Anderson, 419 E. Oklahoma ave., 

Guthrie, Oklahoma. 
Delia C. Miller, 607 Mass. ave., N.E., 

Washington, D.C. 
Annie C. Quackenbush, Warwick, N.Y. 
Elizabeth P. Farmer, 33 Briggs St., Salem, 

Mass. 

Third Prizes, $10. 
Mae F. Murphy, Box 589, Easthampton, 

Mass. 
Permilla Spencer, Mt. Jewett, Pa. 
Mrs. H. F. Locke, Redding, Iowa. 
Alice S. Luka, 2720 Park ave., Philadelphia, 

Pa. 
Georgia Davidson, 246 E. Madison St., 

Chicago, 111. 
Emma McFarland, Martinsburg, Ohio. 



Mrs. Lily Romine, Goodwater, Kan. 

Mrs. Best, Narcrossee, Fla. 

Mrs. Edith Guy, 622 Virginia ave., S.W., 

Washington, D.C. 
A. D. L. Westman, Tannersville, Pa. 

Fourth Prizes, $5. 

Mrs. Clara A. Mackkin, Room 10, Rumford 

Blk., Concord, N.H. 
N. Isabell Edwards, Skaneateles, N.Y. 

Mrs. Emily A. Campbell, 57 Crescent ave., 

Chelsea, Mass. 
May Beal, 316 22d St., Moline, 111. 
Mrs. M. Stonebridge, 2307 Monroe ave., 

New York, N.Y. 
Carrie S. Marsh, Hallstead, Pa. 
Julia A. Carter, 212 South St., Pittsfield, 

Mass. 
Mrs. John Morgan, Dunlor, Wash. 
L. A. Mather, Rushville, N.Y. 
Nettie S. Nichols, 361 Weber ave., Stockton» 

Cal. 



DEPARTMENT NO. 2, 



First Prize, $50. 
Barbara Hohnadel, 1986 3d ave., New 
York, N.Y. 

Second Prizes, $25. 

Mrs. Geo. Sheller, 1731 So. 17th St., Omaha, 

Neb. 
Ida M. Thomas, Box 10S, Ashuelot, N.H. 
Mrs. John Locke, 14 Crescent ave., Chelsea, 

Mass. 
Miss A. L. Davis, 127 North ave., No. 

Cambridge, Mass. 

Third Prizes, $10. 

Adele Gerard, Tallahassee, Fla. 

Mary E. Brown, 92 Washington st., Marble- 

head, Mass. 
Mamie Klotz, 568 E. 157th St., New York, 

N.Y. 
Anna Metcalf, 15th st. and Summit ave., 

Sioux Falls, So. Dak. 
Mrs. S. T. Griggs, Buck Range, Ark. 



Miss J. M. Cooper, North Haven, Conn. 
Mrs. A. P. Hanson, Waseca, Minn. 
Carrie V. Wildey, 152 Keap St., Brooklyn, 

N.Y. 
Lilian L. Carr, 233 W. Canton st., Boston, 

Mass. 
Hattie Howlett, Vandyne,Wis. 

Fourth Prizes, $5. 

Adeline Rodrigues, 19 Whipple st., Brook 

lyn, N.Y. 
Ella W. Klinzing, Mason, W. Va. 
Daisy B. Danvers, Lents, Oregon. 
Annie B. Howard, Hingham Centre, Mass. 
Belle S. Grimes, Woodstock, 111. 
Julia H. Stoeckel, Box 53, Jerseyville, 111. 
Louisa Clark, 102 Patton st., Springfield, 

Mass. 
Mae Sharpe, Sherwood, Mich. 
Mrs. I. DeGraff, Blackwell's island, New 

York. 
Mrs. V. E. McDaniel, Box 47, Houstonia, 

Mo. 



AWARD OF PRIZES. 



11 



DEPARTMENT NO. 3. 



First Prize, $50. 
Miss M. S. Brown, 30 Mt. Pleasant St., 
Woburn, Mass. 

Second Prizes, $25. 
Mrs. M. E. Backus, 17 Cazenove St., Boston, 

Mass. 
Martha Mefzger, St. Albans, W. Va. 
Mrs. H. W. Rowland, Xenia, 111. 
Mrs. Hamlin Jones, Campbell Hall, N.Y. 

Third Prizes, $10. 
Mrs. D. R. Lawrence, Box 122, W. Med- 

way, Mass. 
Mrs. D. R. Harriman, Martinsburg, Ohio. 
Mrs. W. A. Evans, 12 High St., New 

Haven, Conn. 
Sarah R. Anderson, Station A., Cincinnati 

Ohio. 
Mrs. Jas. Beach, Hunt Pt., Sta. R., New 

York, N.Y. 



Miss A. F. Buckholm, 14S Cambridge st., 

Boston, Mass. 
Mrs. M.J. Stratton, Caribou, Me. 
Mrs. Henry Krieger, Holly, Col. 
Mrs. Wm. S. Ciark, Box 366, Nickerson, 

Kan. 
Mrs. S. A. Brock, Trinity Rectory, Lime 

Rock, Conn. 

Fourth Prizes, $5. 
Mrs. E. Williams, Gorin, Mo. 
Nellie A. Hines, Washburn, Me. 
Ada Hobley, Souders, 111. 
Adelaide B. Springer, Toughkenamon, Pa. 
Mrs. C.Jacobs, Falls Village, Conn. 
Helen A. Stevens, Mt. Vernon, Ohio. 
Helen M. Welch, Lawrence, Kan. 
Mrs. H. W. McNabb, 1714 No. 7th st., W. 

Superior, Wis. 
Ada E. Provoncal, Box S30, Newport, Vt. 
Miss E. F. Woods, 15 Mossland St., Soraer- 

ville, Mass. 



DEPARTMENT NO. 4. 



First Prize, $50. 
Miss E. S. Thomas, Schoharie, N.Y. 

Second Prizes, $25. 

Miss J. M. Shaver, Albany, Mo. 
Mrs.J.M. Hobron, 31S W. 121st st., New 

York, N.Y. 
Florence Goodrich, Cobden, 111. 
Jennie R. Welch, Lawrence, Kan. 

Third Prizes, $10. 

Hattie E. Wood, 15 Mossland st., Somer- 

ville, Mass. 
Clara Purviance, 823 No. 14th st., Keokuk, 

Iowa. 
May Sturtevant, Webster, N.H. 
Etta L. Dunn, 47 W. Irving st., Corry, 

Penn. 
Mrs. S. B. Wildey, 152 Keap st., Brooklyn, 

N.Y. 
Mrs. Lily Trimble, Washington, Ark. 



Hannah J. Coggins, 22 Webster st., Med- 
ford, Mass. 

Bertha F. Butler, 447 Meridian st., E. Bos- 
ton, Mass. 

Mrs. A. F. Feilitzsch, Metamora, 111. 

Mrs. A. M. Parmelee, 25S Warren St., Hud- 
son, N.Y. 

Fourth Prizes, $5. 

Laura Phillips, Rutledge, Tenn. 

Mrs. E. Buckner, Burlington, Kan. 

Julia M. Murphy, SS Devens st., Charles- 
town, Mass. 

Mrs. H. W. Woods, Barre, Mass. 

Emma Baker, Pavilion, N.Y. 

Mrs. Y. B. Dennett, Taunton, Mass. 

Sybil McFarland, Martinsburg, Ohio. 

Mrs. G. M. Bosworth, 12 Florence st., 
Maiden, Mass. 

Mrs. R.J. Emery, Gaines, N.Y. 

Emma E. Nash, 70 Franklin st., Cam- 
bridgeport, Mass. 



12 



BARBOUR S PRIZE NEEDLE-WORK SERIES. 



DEPARTMENT No. 5. 



First Prize, $50. 
Mrs. W. L. Gavett, 17 Sanford ave., Plain- 
field, N.J. 

Second Prizes, $25. 
Mrs. A. E. Ould, 118 W. 61st st., New 

York, N.Y. 
Mrs. John Shaw, Red Oak, Iowa. 
Mrs. A. Harford, Verona, 111. 
E. F. Fitch, 5S Olive st., New Haven, 

Conn. 

Third Prizes, $10. 
Stella M. Day, Box 106, Hampden, Mass. 
Nellie Bickford, 40 Asylum st., Hartford 

Conn. 
Mrs. A. H. Hall, 1367 Antoine st., Detroit, 

Mich. 
Emma Danvers, Lents, Oregon. 
Mrs. H. W. Rankin, Plainneld, N.J. 
Ida J. Whitehouse, Suncook, N.H. 



Mrs.M. A. Fenton, Verndale, Minn. 
Miss A. P. Haag, 52S Euclid ave., Cleveland, 

Ohio. 
Mrs. C. M. Kryger, Odell City, So. Dak. 
Florence G. Conway, 9 Pearl st., Marble. 

head, Mass. 

Fourth Prizes, $5. 

Alice Hinckley, Box 211, Stonington, Conn. 

Julia Hill, HalfWay, N.Y. 

Mary E. Ray, Metamora, 111. 

Florence L. Allen, Whitinsville, Mass. 

Cora Burris, Box 375, Clinton, Mo. 

Mary F. Gates, 8 Howard st., Westneld, 

Mass. 
Helen" E. Lord, 80 Elizabeth st., Utica, 

N.Y. 
Sarah Henry, Broadway and 26th st., Pater. 

son, N.J. 
Mrs. W. L. Eckels, Mechanicsburg, Pa. 
Mrs. Eliza H. Irish, Windham Centre, Me. 



DEPARTMENT No. 6. 



First Prize, $50. 
Libbie M. Fisk, Maywood, 111. 

Second Prizes, $25. 
J. Florence Caplin, 408 So. Ninth St., Min- 
neapolis, Minn. 
Mrs. T. P. Chase, Socorro, New Mexico. 
May Betzer, Seward, Neb. 
Josie W. Stratton, Kent's Hill, Me. 

Third Prizes, $10. 
Sallie Story, Box 207, Catskill, N.Y. 
Sarah A. Stanton, Otselie, N.Y. 
Erne Fenton, Box 204, Pine Island, Minn. 
Isabell Danvers, Lents, Oregon. 
Mrs. H. C. Wells, Platte City, Mo. 
Miss M. O'Reilly, Walnut ave., Jamaica 

Plain, Mass. 
Mrs. E. S. Hayes, 713 No. Main st., Bloom- 

ington, 111. 
Mrs. D. W. Mandell, Greenwich, N.Y. 



Mrs. R. A. Bartlett, Caribou, Me. 
Mrs. C. A. Jewell, 22 Wyoming st., Rox- 
bury, Mass. 

Fourth Prizes, $5. 

Mrs. L. DeLange, 101 Opera House Blk., 
Denver, Col. 

Mrs. D. Warner, Grove, Ohio. 

Mrs. J. P. Campbell, 4J. Eden st., Chelsea, 
Mass. 

Mrs. E. C. Weber, 843 22d ave., Minneapo- 
lis, Minn. 

Mrs. E. F. Heroy, 327 Salmon st., Port- 
land, Oregon. 

Mrs. L. T. Dickinson, 924 Gillespie st., 
Chattanooga, Tenn. 

Maggie Stout, Centerville, N.J. 

Mrs. Oscar Morse, W. Medvvay, Mass. 

Mrs. Amanda Flint, Portland, Pa. 

Alice Pangborn, Main st., Aylmer, Canada, 
PQ^ 



AWARD OF PRIZES. 



13 



DEPARTMENT NO. 7, 



First Prize, $50. 
Elise Jungbluth, Beverly Plantation, Beau- 
fort, S.C. 

Second Prizes, $25. 
Mathilde E. Jones, Beverly Plantation, 

Beaufort, S.C. 
Mrs. H. Naylor, 200 E. 10th St., Austin, 

Tex. 
Mrs. G. L. Cooper, 240 E. Main St., Meriden, 

Conn. 
Mrs. H. Phil, 6 Weed st., Lowell, Mass. 

Third Prizes, $10. 
Fannie G. Sawyer, Box 122, W. Medway, 

Mass. 
Miss M. J. McCollough, Bloomington, Ind. 
Ellen M. Williston, Wellsboro, Pa. 
Florence D. Reynolds, Franklinville, N.Y. 
Inez Redding-, 57 Crescent ave., Chelsea, 

Mass. 
Mrs. N. H. Moon, W. Medway, Mass. 



Haidee Smith, Box itjo, W. Medway, Mass. 
Miss C. B. Fitch, 5S Olive St., New Haven, 

Conn. 
Mrs. D. C. Thomas, Willow Grove, Ky. 
Mary Laughren, 176 Williams St., Montreal, 

Canada. 

Fourth Prizes, $5. 

Mary E. Rowe, Melville, La. 

Mrs. K. W. Lant, Newton, Iowa. 

Margaret Blanchard, 110 Charles St., Bos- 
ton, Mass. 

Mrs. L. C. Bradford, Holland, Mich. 

Edna F. Smith, 103 State St., Newburyport, 
Mass. 

Lucy A. H. Smith, 3S9 W. 4th st., So. Bos- 
ton, Mass. 

Mamie Hegner, 1246 Villa st., Racine, Wis. 

Mrs. Perry Wightman, 673 Sheffield ave., 
Chicago, 111. 

Lily Faas, Leeds, Mass. 

Mrs.C. A. Van Dewalker, Pamelia,N.Y. 



DEPARTMENT NO. 8. 



First Prize, $50. 
M.J. Davis, 14 Eldert st., Brooklyn, N.Y. 

Second Prizes, $25. 
Mrs. M. Croft, San Diego, Tex. 
Gertrude Bradley, 103 State st., Newbury- 
port, Mass. 
Mrs. C. A. Stearns, Coronado Beach, Cal. 
May Forncrook, Eldridge, N.Y. 

Third Prizes, $10. 
Mrs. W. H. Ely, Brooklyn, Pa. 
Mrs. S. R. Sharp, Box 86, Homer, 111. 
Mrs. F. H. Fox, 154 Main st., W. Superior, 

Wis. 
A. M. Fitch, 5S Olive st., New Haven, 

Conn. 
Miss S. W. Fisk, Fayetteville, N.Y. 
Phena Milne, 143 Lafayette ave., Passaic, 

N.J. 
Mattie H. Chamberlain, Jordan, N.Y. 



Abbie Spooner, Greenville, Mich. 

Mrs. G. W. Hubbard, 17S De Kalb ave., 

Brooklyn, N.Y. 
Mrs. C. H. Weagley, 1422 Washington ave., 

St. Louis, Mo. 

Fourth Prizes, $5. 

Annie King, 426 North st., Pittsfield, Mass. 

Jane Murphy, 23 Monument ave., Charles- 
town, Mass. 

Alice A. Chamberlain, Sennett, N.Y. 

Jessie D. Roedel, 12 No. Fifth st., Lebanon, 
Pa. 

Mrs. J. P. W. Harlan, 1637 Washington 
ave., St. Louis, Mo. 

Mrs. Chas. Cleaver, 5335 Cornell ave., 
Chicago, 111. 

Miss M. L. Boswell, Oakley, Pa. 

Mrs. G. C. Millersen, Mechanicsburg, Pa. 

Mrs. Geo. Chamberlain, Eldridge, N.Y. 

Lena Thatcher, Frankfort, N.J. 



14 



barbour's prize needle-work series. 



DEPARTMENT NO. 9. 



First Prize, $50. 
Eliza Sherman, De Fumak Springs, Fla. 

Second Prizes, $25. 

Annie S.Converse, So. Worthington, Mass. 
S. E. Morrison, 39 E.62d St., New York, 

N.Y. 
Lillian E. Converse, So. Worthington, 

Mass. 
Jeannette Gardhouse, Box 172, Rochelle, 111. 

Third Prizes, $10. 

Jennie M. Phipps, Stanton, Mich. 

Helen Robbing, 795 Washington St., Boston, 

Mass. 
Clara Bell, Strafford, N.Y. 
Mrs. N. E. Rowe, 49 Oak St., Taunton, 

Mass. 
Edith Williams, 23 Grosvenor st., Toronto, 

Canada. 



Edith R. Wills, 09 State st., Newburyport, 
Mass. 

Susan H. Mann, 32 Prospect st., Green- 
field, Mass. 

Anna May, Cinnaminson, N.J. 

Anna P. Clark, Colmar, Pa. 

Lizzie L. Anthony, Box 24, Oroville, Cal. 

Fourth Prizes, $5. 

Miss E. Flo Trimmer, Hanovor, Pa. 

Esther Macks, Los Gatos, Cal. 

Lissie Lowe, Rutledge, Tenn. 

Mrs. M. L. Gould, La Tourette House, 
Bayonne, N.T. 

Mrs. H. A. Shelden, 2S Clarke St., New- 
port, R.I. 

Mrs. Mary Metcalf, Whitinsville, Mass. 

Mrs. C. L. Coyner, San Diego, Texas. 

Maggie Eddy, Audubon, Iowa. 

Mrs. D. O. Gilbert, Benkelman, Neb. 

Maida Brewer, Largo, New Mexico. 



DEPARTMENT No. 10. 



First Prize, $50. 
Miss A. M. Von Blomberg, 30S Boylston 
st., Boston, Mass. 

Second Prizes, $25. 
Jeanne Marcelles, Holliston, Mass. 
Miss E. S. Egery, Barre, Mass. 
M. M. Babbitt, Randolph, Mass. 
Mrs.H.E.Clough, 16 Liberty St., Oshkosh, 
Wis. 

Third Prizes, $10. 

Mrs. Robt. Purdy, Noroton, Conn. 

Mrs. E. S. Wood, Box 166, Rondout, N.Y. 

Ruthie Stratton, W. Medway, Mass. 

A. M. Fitch, 5S Olive St., New Haven, 
Conn. 

Mrs. H. F. Walker, 123 Washington st., 
Lynn, Mass. 

Mrs. C. L. Hollister, Box 193, Eldora, Iowa, 

Maria A. Hamblett, Box 205, Milford, 
N.H. 

Alice M. Robinson, 42 Granite St., Glouces- 
ter, Mass. 



Mrs. A. W. Stratton, Box 15S, Framing- 
ham, Mass. 

Mrs. Charles Breck, The Dakota, New 
York, N.Y. 

Fourth Prizes, $5. 

Mrs. Alida Lipe, Box 310, Canajoharie, 
N.Y. 

Miss T. A. Anders, Plymouth, Iowa. 

Miss A. Z. Potter, 673 Sheffield ave., 
Chicago, 111. 

Flora L. Metheny, Epsom, Ind. 

Bertha Weaber, Box 8S2, Vineland, N.J. 

Mrs. H. M. Brent, 1914 Centre ave., Bay 
City, Mich. 

Miss S. Sage, Peoria, Fla. 

Ida F. Wildey, 152 Keap St., Brooklyn, 
N.Yo 

Mrs. Henry Egan, no Bernard st., San 
Francisco, Cal. 

Mrs. E. L. DeWitt, S41 E. Broad St., Co- 
lumbus, Ohio. 



DEPARTMENT 1, 



PART 1. -KNITTING. 



LINEN COUNTERPANE. 

PRIZE ARTICLE. 

[Contributed by Miss M. S. Brown, No. 30 Mt. Pleasant St., Woburn, Mass.] 

Materials : Barbour's flax thread, No. ioo, 3 -cord, 200 yards 
spools, two steel needles, No. 19, and sixteen large hemstitched linen 
handkerchiefs. If pillow-shams and scarf for dressing-case are 
made to match, four handkerchiefs will be needed for each sham, 
and three for the scarf. To make the spread, join the handker- 
chiefs with the insertion, four each way, and edge all around with 
the lace. Either lace or insertion may be made wider, if desired, 
by repeating the pattern. 




Linen Counterpane. — Insertion. 

Insertion. — Cast on 17 sts, knit across plain. 

1. K 3, o, n, k 3, o, k 1, o, n, k 3, o, n, k 1. 

2. K 3, o, n, n, o, k 3, o, n, k 3, o, n, k 1. 

3. K 3, o, n, n, o, k 5, o, n, k 1, o, n, k 1. 



16 barbour's prize needle-work series, 

4. K 3, o, n, o, n, k 3, n, o, n, k 1, o, n, k 1. 

5. K 3, o, n, k 1, o, n, k 1, n, o, k 3, o, n, k 1. 

6. K 3, o, n, k 2, o, n, si and b, o, k 4, o, n, k 1. 
Repeat from 1st row. 

Lace. — Cast on 31 sts, knit across plain. 




Linen Counterpane. — Lace. 

1. K 3, o, n, k 3, * o, k i, o, n, k 3, n, repeat from *, o, k i, 
o, k 6. 

2. K 6, * o, k 3, o, n, k 1, n, repeat from *, o, k 3, o, n, k 3, o, 
n ; k 1. 

3. K 3, o, n, n, * o, k 5, o, si, n and b, repeat from *, o, k 5, 

0, k 6. 

4. Cast off 4, k 1, o, * n, k 3, n, o, k 1,0, repeat from *, n, k 
3, n, o, n, k 1, o, n, k 1. 

5. K 3, o, n, k 1, o, * n, k, 1, n, o, k 3, o, repeat from *, n, k 

1, n, o, k 3. 

6. K 3, o, k 1, o, * si, n and b, o, k 5, o, repeat from *, si, n 
and b, o, k 4, o, n, k 1. 

Repeat from 1st row. 



SPIDER LACE, 



17 



SPIDER LACE. 

PRIZE ARTICLE. 

[Contributed by Adelia F. Burkholm, 359 Broadway, Everett, Mass.] 

Materials : Barbour's flax thread, No. 90, 3-cord, 200 yards spools, 
and 2 steel needles, No. 16. 

Cast on 22 sts ; knit across plain. 




Spider Lace. 



i. SI 1, k 1, o, n, o, k 1, o, n, o, n, k 1, n, o, n, o, k 1, o, n, o, 
n, k 3. 

2, 4, 6, 8, 10. K plain. To form a nice edge by which to sew 
the lace to material, put needle under thread, at beginning of these 
rows, insert same toward you into 1st st, slip st to right-hand needle, 
then throw thread forward. This does nor make any extra stitches, 



18 barbour's prize needle-work series. 

but forms a chain along the upper edge of the lace, and when sew 
ing lace on, if care is taken to catch both sides of each link of this 
chain to the garment, a very pretty hem-stitching is formed. 

3. SI 1, k 1, o, n, o, k 3, o, n, o, si, n and b, o, n, o, k 3, o, n, 
o, n, k 2. 

5. Si 1, k 1, o, n, o, k 5, o, si, n and b, o, n, o, k 5, o, n, o, n, 
k 1. 

7. SI and b, k 1,0, n, o, n, k 1, n, o, n, o, k 1,0, n, o, n, k 1, n, 
o, n, o, k 3. 

g. SI 1, n, o, n, o, sl, n and b, o, n, o, k 3, 0,11, o, si, n and b, o, 
n, o, k 4. 

11. Sl 1, n, o, sl, n and b, o, n, o, k 5, o, sl, n and b, o, n, o, 

12. K plain. Repeat from 1st row. 

This pattern is nearly wholly original with me, and is a very pretty 
trimming for handkerchiefs, etc. An insertion to match is made by 
knitting both edges alike. The lace may be easily knitted wider or 
narrower, by repeating the pattern. I have used this design for 
lace curtains, which were considered very beautiful. 



LEAF AND SHELL LACE. 

PRIZE ARTICLE. 

[Contributed by Elizabeth P. Farmer, 33 Brig-gs Street, Salem, Mass.] 

Materials : Barbour's flax thread, No. ioo, 3-cord, 200 yards 
spools, and 2 knitting-needles, No. 22. 
Cast on 62 sts, k across plain. 

1. K 3, o, n, k 1, o, k 1, n, p 1, n, k 1, o, k 1, o, k 1, n, p 1, n, 
k 1, o, k 1, o, k 1, n, p 1, n, k 1, o, k 1, o, k 1, n, p 1, n, k 1, o, k 

3, o, n, k 2, o 2, n, k 12 (o 2, p 2 tog), twice. 

2. O, p 2 tog, o 2, p 2 tog, k 13, k 1 loop, p 1 loop, k 4, o, n, p 

4, k 1, p 3, k 1, p 3, k 1, p 7, k 1, p 3, k 1, p 3, k 1, p 5, k 1, o, n, 
k 1. 

3. K 3, o, n, k 1, o, k 1, n, p 1, n, k 1, p 1, k 1, n, p 1, n, k 1, 



LEAF AND SHELL LACE, 



19 



0, k i, o, k i, n, p i, n, k i, p i,ki,n,p i, n, k i, o, k 3, o, n, k 
17 (o 2, p 2 tog), twice. 

4. O, p 2 tog, o 2, p 2 tog, k 19, o, n, p 4, k 1, p 2, k 1, p 2, k 

1, P 7. k 1, p 2, k 1, p 2, k 1, p 5, k 1, o, n, k 1. 

5. K 3, o, n, k 1, o, k 1, o, n, p 1, n, p 1, n, p 1, n, o, k 1, o, k 




Leaf and Shell Lace. 



t, o, k 1, o, n, p 1, n, p 1, n, p 1, 11, o, k 1, o, k 3, o, n, k 2 (02, 
n), twice, k 11 (o 2, p 2 tog), twice. 

6. O, p 2 tog, o 2, p 2 tog, k 13, p 1, k 2, p 1, k 4, o, n, p 5, k 
1 p i,k i,p i,k i,p 9,k i,p i,k i,p i,k i,p6, k 1,0, n, k 1. 

7. K 3, o, n, k 1, o, k 3, o, si, n and b, p 1, si, n and b, o, k 3, 
o, k 1, o, k 3, o, si, n and b, p 1, si, n and b, o, k 3, o, k 3, o, n, k 2 
(o 2, n), 3 times, k 11 (o 2, p 2 tog), twice. 

8. O, p 2 tog, o 2, p 2 tog, k 13, p 1, k 2, p 1, k 2, p 1, k 4, o, 
n, p 7, k 1, p 13, k 1, p 8, k, 1, o, n, k 1. 

9. K 3, o, n, k 1, o, k 5, o, si, n and b, o, k 5, o, k 1, o, k 5,0, 
si, n and b, o, k 5, o, k 3, o, n, k 22 (o 2, p 2 tog), twice. 

10. O, p 2 tog, o 2, p 2 tog, k 24, o, n, p 34, k 1, o, n, k 1. 

11. K 3, o, n, k 1, o, k 1, n, p 1, n, k 1, o, k i,o,ki, n,p 1, 



20 barbour's prize needle-work series. 

n, k i, o, k i, o, k i, n, p i, n, k i, o, k i, o, k i, n, p i, n, k 1, o, 
k 3, o, n, k 2 (o 2, n), 4 times, k 12 (o 2, p 2 tog), twice. 

12. O, p 2 tog, o 2, p 2 tog, k 13 (k 1, p i,-k 1), 3 times, k 1, 
p 1 (in loop), k 4, o, n, p 4, k 1, p 3, k 1, p 3, k 1, p 7, k 1, p 3, 
k 1, p 3, k i,p 5,k i,o,n, k 1. 

13. K 3, o, n, k 1, o, k 1, n, p 1, n, k 1, p 1, k 1, n, p 1, n, k 
1, o, k 1, o, k 1, n, p 1, n, k 1, p 1, k 1, n, p 1, n, k 1, o, k 3, o, n, 
k 26 (o 2, p 2 tog), twice. 

14. O, p 2 tog, o 2, p 2 tog, k 28, o, n, p 4, k 1, p 2, k 1, p 2, 
k 1, p 7, k 1, p 2, k 1, p 2, k 1, p 5, k 1, o, n, k 1. 

15. K 3, o, n, k 1, o, k 1, o, n, p 1, n, p 1, n, p 1, n, o, k 1, o, k 
1, o, k 1, o, n, p 1, n, p 1, n, p 1, n, o, k 1, o, k 3, o, n, k 2 (o 2, 
n),5 times, k 14, (o 2, p 2 tog), twice. 

16. O, p 2 tog, o 2, p 2 tog, k 15 (k 1, p 1, k 1), 4 times, k 1, 
p 1, k4, o, n, p 5,k 1, p 1, k 1, p i,k i,p 9, k 1, p i,k i,pi,ki, 
p 6, k 1, o, n, k 1. 

17. K 3, o, n, k 1, o, k 3, o, si, n and b, p 1, si, n and b, o, k 
3, o, k 1, o, k 3, o, si, n and b, p 1, si, n and b, o, k 3, o, k 3, o, n, 
k 2 (02, n), 6 times, k 17 (o 2, p 2 tog), twice. 

18. O, p 2 tog, o 2, p 2 tog, k 18 (k 1, p 1, k 1), 5 times, k 1, 
p 1, k 4, o, n, p 7, k 1, p 13, k 1, p 8, k 1, o, n, k 1. 

ig. K 3, o, n, k 1, o, k 5, o, si, n and b, o, k 5, o, k 1, o, k 5, 
o, si, n and b, o, k 5, o, k 3, o, n, k 16, take 16th st back on left- 
hand needle, slip 21 sts over it, then take it back on right-hand 
needle, knitting it (o 2, p 2 tog), twice. 

20. O, p 2 tog, o 2, p 2 tog, k 18, o, n, p 34, k 1, o, n, k 1. 

The upper part of the lace, omitting the scallop, makes a 
beautiful insertion. 



DIAMOND LACE FLOUNCE. 

PRIZE ARTICLE. 

[Contributed by Mrs. H. F. Locke, Redding, Iowa.] 

Materials : Barbour's flax thread, No. 80, 3 -cord, 200 yards 
spools, and 2 knitting-needles, No. 19. 



DIAMOND LACE FLOUNCE. 21 

Cast on 1 1 1 sts. 

i. SI i, k 2, * o, n, k 2 (n, o 2, n), twice, k 3, n, o, k 1, repeat 
from * 5 times. 

2. O, k rest plain, p 1, k 1, in o 2 loops. All even rows same 
to 50th. 

3. SI 1, k 3, * o, n, k 3, n, o 2, n, k 4, n, o, k 3, repeat from * 
5 times. 

5. SI 1, k 4, * o, n, k 9, n, o, k 5, repeat 5 times from *. 

7. SI 1, k 5, * o, n, k 7, n, o, k 7, repeat 5 times, always from *. 

9. SI 1, k 6, * o, n, k 5, n, o> k 9, repeat 5 times. 

11. SI 1, k 7, * o, n, k 3, n, o, k 3, n, o 2, n, k 4, repeat 5 
times. 

13. Si 1, k 8, * o, n, k 1, n, o, k 2 (n, o 2, n), twice, k 3, re- 
peat 5 times. 

15. SI 1, k 9, * o, k 3 tog, o, k 5, n, o 2, n, k 6, repeat 5 times. 

17. SI 1, k to, o, k 3 tog, k 2 (n, o 2, n), twice, k 3, n, * o, k 
1, o, n, k 2 (n, o 2, n), twice, k 3, n, repeat from * 3 times, o, k 1, 
o, n, k 2 (n, o 2, n), twice, k 4, o, k 1. 

19. SI 1, k 11, * o, n, k 3, n, o 2, n, k 4, n, o, k 3, repeat 5 
times. 

21. SI 1, k 12, * o, n, k 9, n, o, k 5, repeat 5 times. 

23. SI 1, k 2, n, o 2, n, k 7, * o, n, k 7, n, o, k 7, repeat 5 
times. 

25. Si 1, k 14, * o, n, k 5, n, o, k 9, repeat 5 times. 

27. SI 1, k 15, * o, n, k 3, n, o, k 3, n, o 2, n, k 4, repeat 5 
limes. 

29. SI 1, k 16, * o, n, k 1, n, o, k 2 (n, o 2, n), twice, k 3, re- 
peat 5 times. 

31. SI 1, k 2 (n, o 2, n), twice, k 7, * o, k 3 tog, o, k 5, n, o 2, 
n, k 6, repeat 5 times. 

33. SI 1, k 18, o, k 3 tog, k 2, (n, o 2, n), twice, k 3, * n, o, k 1, 
o, n, k 2 (n, o 2, n), twice, k 3, repeat 4 times from *, k 1, o, k 1. 

35. SI 1, k 19, * o, n, k 3, n, o 2, n, k 4, n, o, k 3, repeat 5 
times. 

37. SI 1, k 20, * o, n, k 9, n, o, k 5, repeat 5 times. 

39. SI 1, k 2, n, o 2, n, k 15, * o, n, k 7, n, o, k 7, repeat 5 times. 




Diamond Lace Flounce. 



DIAMOND LACE FLOUNCE. 23 

41. SI i, k 22, * o, n, k 5, n, o, k 9, repeat 5 times. 

43. SI 1, k 15, n, o 2, n, k 4, * o, n, k 3, n, o, k 3, n, o 2, n, k 
4, repeat 5 times. 

45. SI t, k 13 (n, o 2, n), twice, k 3, * o, n, k 1, n, o, k 2 (n, 
o 2, n), twice, k 3, repeat 5 times. 

47. SI 1, k 2 (n, o 2, n), 3 times, k 1, n, o 2, n, k 6, * o, k 3 
tog, o, k 5, n, o 2, n, k 6, repeat 5 times. 

49. SI 1, k 13 (n, o 2, n), twice, k 3, n, * o, k 1, o, n, k 2 (n, 
o 2, n), twice, k 3, n, repeat 5 times. 

50. Plain. All even rows same, save 64th and 80th. 

51. SI 1, k 15, n, o 2, n, k 4, n, * o, k 3, o, n, k 3, n, o 2, n, k 4, 
n, repeat 5 times. 

53. SI 1, k 22, n, * o, k 5, o, n, k 9, n, repeat 5 times. 

55. SI 1, k 2, n, o 2, n, k 15, n, * o, k 7, o, n, k 7, n, repeat 5 
times. 

57. SI 1, k 20, n, * o, k 9, o, n, k 5, n, repeat 5 times. 

59. SI 1, k 19, n, * o, k 3, n, o 2, n k 4, o, n, k 3, n, repeat 5 
times. 

61. SI 1, k 18, n, * o, k 2 (n, o 2, n), twice, k 3, o, n, k 1, n 
repeat 5 times. 

63. SI 1, k 2 (n, o 2, n), twice, k 7, n, * o, k 5, n, o 2, n, k 6, 

0, k 3 tog, repeat 5 times. 

64. N, k rest plain. 

65. SI 1, k 16, n, o, k 1, o, k 3 (n, o 2, n), twice, k 3, n, * o, k 

1, o, n, k 2 (n, o 2, n), twice, k 3, n, repeat from * 4 times. 

67. SI 1, k 15, n, * o, k 3, o, n, k 3, n, o 2, n, k 4, n, repeat 5 
times. 

69. SI 1, k 14, n, * o, k 5, o, n, k 9, n, repeat 5 times. 

71. SI 1, k 2, n, o 2, n, k 7, n, * o, k 7, o, n, k 7, n, repeat 5 
times. 

73. SI 1, k 12, n, * o, k 9, o, n, k 5, n, repeat 5 times. 

75. SI 1, k 11, n, * o, k 3, n, o 2, n, k 4, o, n, k 3, n, repeat 5 
times. 

77. SI 1, k 10, n, * o, k 2 (n, o 2, n), twice, k 3, o, n, k 1, n, 
repeat 5 times. 

79. SI. 1, k 9, n, * o, k 5, n, o 2, n, k 6, o, k 3 tog, repeat 5 times. 



24 barbour's prize needle-work series. 

80. X, k rest plain. 

81. SI 1, k 8, D a o, k 1, o, k 3 (n, o 2, n), twice, k 3, n, * o, k 
i, o, n, k 2 (n, o 2, n), twice, k 3, n, repeat 4 times. 

83. SI i, k 7. n, *o,k3, o, n, k 3, n, o 2,11, k 4, n, repeat 5 
times. 

85. SI 1, k 6, n, * o, k 5, o, n, k 9, n, repeat 5 times. 

87. SI 1, k 5, n, * o, k 7, o, n, k 7. n, repeat 5 times. 

89. SI 1, k 4. 11, * o, k 9, o, n, k 5, n, repeat 5 times. 

91. SI 1, k 3, n, * o, k 3, n, o 2, n, k 4, o, n, k 3, n, repeat 5, 
times. 

93. SI i a k 2. n, * o, k 2 (n, o 2, n). twice, k 3, o, n, k 1, n, re- 
peat 5 times. 

95. SI 1, k 1, n, * o, k 5, n, o 2, n, k 6, o, k 3 tog, repeat 5 
times. 

96. K plain. 

Repeat from 1st row. This lace may be made as much wider or 
narrower as desired. It is a useful pattern for knitting a variety of 
articles, such as yokes, sleeves, tidies, etc., and beautiful window 
draperies may be knitted entirely of the diamonds, with pointed 
edge. 



LINK LACE. 



[Contributed by Miss S. Viletta Doaxe, Essex, Conn.] 

Materials : Barbour's flax thread, No. 80, 3-cord, 200 yards spools, 
and 2 steel needles, No. 17. 
Cast on 18 sts, k once across. 

1. K 3 (o 2, p 2 tog, k 1), 4 times, k 3. 

2, 3,4, 5, 6 « 7< 8 - Like ist row - 

9. K 3 (o 2, k 3 tog, k3 tog, o 4, k3tog, k 3 tog, 02)^3. 

10. K 3 (o 2, p i,k ist and 3d sts on left-hand needle tog, n, 
pi, 02, k 1, k 1 st and 3d sts tog, n. k 1 ), o, k 3. 

To shorten the links, omit the 7th and 8th rows. The lace may 
be made of any desired width by knitting the directions inclosed in 
parentheses the requisite number of times, and any pretty scallop 



PAUL REVERE ROSES. 



25 



maybe added to form an edge. By repeating these directions, also, 
the pattern may be used for cushion-covers, yokes, sleeves, or for 




Link Lace. 



any desired purpose. Care should be taken in knitting to make i 
st of each o when going back in 9th and 10th rows. In other rows, 
o 2 makes 1 st when going back. 



PART 2. -CROCHETING. 



PAUL REVERE ROSES. 



PRIZE ARTICLE. 

[Contributed by Nettie M. Poole, 2 Bellingham Ave., Revere, Mass.] 

Materials : Barbour's flax thread, No. 80, 3-cord, 200-yards 
spools, and a fine steel hook. 

1. Ch 10, join ; * ch 3, catch in the ring, repeat from * 4 times; 
in ch of 3 work 1 dc, 1 stc, 3 tc, 1 stc, 1 dc ; repeat to form 5 
scallops, which make the inner petals of the rose. Ch 4, catch with 



26 barbour's prize needle-work series. 

stc between petals of last row, at the back ; fill each ch of 4 with 1 
dc, 1 stc, 7 tc, 1 stc, 1 dc. For 3d row, make ch of 5, catching 
between petals of last row, and fill as before, with 4 more tc in each 
shell or petal, drawing out the sts longer. Ch 6, for the next row, 
catching between each previous petal with a tc, and work as in 5 th 
row, adding 3 extra tc. Catch the petals down closely, after last 
is made, ch 30, turn, work b _, ck with 1 dc in each st, fasten securely 
and break thread. This completes rose and stem. 

2. For the leaf, ch 10, 1 dc in each st except last, in that 3 sts ; 




Paul Revere Roses. 

work up the side in right of sts, ch 1, turn, work back, with 3 sts 
in last ; then work up other side and down again same way as be- 
fore, until the leaf has 2 notches on each side. Make 2 leaves, 
join to stem at 8th st, 1 each side, joining at side of leaf to last 
petals of rose. Fasten next 2 leaves 8 sts above on stem, and 
join 2d spray to 1st in working. 

3. For the heading, fasten in top of stem, ch 10, catch in tip of 
leaf on next spray, ch 20, catch in next stem, and repeat to end ; 
turn, ch 3, and make a tc in each st of ch. 

This pattern makes very pretty passementerie. 



PANSY LACE. 27 

PANSY LACE. 

PRIZE ARTICLE. 

[Contributed by Miss Alice S. Luka, 2720 Park Ave., Philadelphia, Perm.] 

Materials : Barbour's flax thread, No. 80, 3 -cord, 200-yards spools, 
and a fine steel hook. Begin working the circle first. 

1. Ch 10, close in a loop with 1 sc in 1st st of ch, ch 4, to 
take place of 1 dtc (thread over twice), 20 dtc in loop, each sepa- 
rated by 1 ch, join with 1 sc to top of 4 ch. 

2. Ch 3, 3 trebles in same st with sc, * 3 tc under 1 ch, repeat 
from * 19 times, at the end of round fasten with sc in 3 ch, turn. 

3. Ch 1, 1 dc in each st around, taking the back half of st, 1 sc 
in 1st dc, at end of round, turn. 

4. Ch 1, dc in every st around, taking back half of st, sc in 1 ch 
at end, turn. These two rounds form a rib. 

5. Ch 1, dc in each of 9 sts, taking back half, as before, ch 10, 
close in a loop with sc.in last dc, dc in next 4 sts, turn; ch 1, 14 
dtc in loop with 1 ch between each, ch 1, fasten in 4th dc, turn; 
ch 1, 3 tc under every 1 ch, at end of round miss 2 dc, sc in 
next dc, turn; ch 1, dc in every st (taking back half of loop), at 
end of round make 1 dc in each of 3 dc, turn ; ch 3, miss 3 dc, dc 
in next dc, * ch 4, miss 1 dc, dc in next dc, repeat from * around, 
at end make dc in each of 3 dc, turn; * ch 5, dc in 4 ch, repeat 
from * around. This completes one side petal of the " pansy. 1 ' 

6. Ch 2, miss 1 dc, dc in next 10 dc, as before, ch 10, close 
with sc in last dc, 4 dc in next 4 dc, turn; ch 1, 14 dtc in loop, each 
separated by 1 ch, miss 2 dc at end, 1 sc in next dc, turn; ch 1, 3 
tc under every 1 ch all around, miss 2 dc, fasten with sc in 3d dc, 
turn; ch 1, dc in every dc, always taking back half of loop, miss 
2 dc at end of round, fasten in 3d dc with 1 sc, turn; ch 1, dc 
in each dc, to end of round, dc in next 3 dc, turn ; ch 4, miss 3 
dc, dc in next dc, * ch 4, miss 1, dc in next dc, repeat from * 
around, dc in next 3 dc, turn; ch 2, dc in 2 ch of last circle, turn; 
ch 2, dc in 4 ch, ch 2, sc in 5 ch of previous circle, turn; ch 2, dc 
in 4 ch * ch 5, dc in next 4 ch, repeat all around. 



28 



BARBOUR S PRIZE NEEDLE-WORK SERIES. 



7. Ch 2, miss 1 dc, dc in 11 dc, ch 10, close in a loop with sc 
in last dc, 4 dc in next 4 dc, turn; ch 1, 14 dtc in loop, with 1 ch 
between each, at end of round ch 1, miss 3 dc, sc in next, turn ; ch 
1, 3 tc under every 1 ch, miss 2 dc, sc in next, turn; ch 1, dc in dc 
around, miss t dc of centre circle, sc in 2d dc, turn; ch 1, dc in 
every dc, at end of round dc in 3 dc, turn ; ch 4, miss 3 dc, dc in 




Pansy Lace. 



4th dc, * ch 4, miss 1, dc in next st, repeat from *, at end of round 
ch 2, dc in each of 3 dc of centre circle, turn; ch 2, dc in 2 ch of 
previous circle, turn ; ch 2, dc in 4 ch of working circle, ch 2, turn ; 
sc in 5 ch of previous circle, turn ; 2 ch, dc in 4 ch of circle, * ch 
5, dc in 4 ch, repeat from * 20 times, after dc in 4 ch make 2 
ch, sc in 5 ch of 2d circle, ch 2, dc in 1st ch of 5th round, ch 2, sc 
in ch at end of previous circle, ch 2, break off thread and fasten 
neatly. 

Repeat pattern from beginning. 

Connect the last design to the previous one when working the 6th 
round of 5 ch loops ; 7 ch are left between the 2 scallops, on each 
side ; after the 7 th chain, work 2 ch, fasten with sc in 8th ch of last 
design, * ch 2, turn, dc in 4 ch of 5th round, ch 2, sc in next ch, 



PANSY LACE. 29 

turn, * repeat twice from * to *, then * ch 5, dc in 4 ch, repeat 
from * around. 
For the heading : 

1. Begin in 8th ch, * ch 4, 2 dc in next ch, ch 4, 2 dc in next 
ch, ch 4, 2 dc in next ch, ch 4, 2 dc in next ch, ch 4, 2 dc in next 
ch, ch 4, 2 dc in next ch, ch 2, dtc between the connections of the 
2 petals, ch 2, 2 dc in 4 ch, repeat from *. 

2. Begin in 4 ch at beginning of previous row, 4 dc in ch, 4 dc 
in next ch, repeat, putting 4 dc under each ch, 7 times in all, * ch 2, 
4 dc under next ch, repeat, putting 4 dc under each of 8 ch, in all, 
repeat from * to end. 

3. Begin at beginning of 2d row, dc in every dc, 2 dc under 2 
ch all the way across. 

4. Begin in 1st dc, with 1 dc, ch 3, dtc in same st, miss 3 sts, 
* 2 dtc in 4th st, retain last sts of 1st on needle and work off with 
last st of 2d dtc, ch 3, dc in same st with dtc, ch 7, miss 3 sts, dc 
in 4th st, ch 3, 2 dtc in same st, miss 4 sts, * 2 dtc in next st, 
ch 3, dc in with dtc, * ch 7, miss 3 sts, dc in next st, ch 3, 2 dtc in 
same st, miss 4 sts, 2 dtc in next, ch 3, dc in same st, ch 7, miss 3 
sts, sc in next 3 sts, ch 7, miss 3 sts, dc in next, ch 3, 2 dtc in same 
st, miss 4 sts, 2 dtc in next, ch 3 dc in same st, repeat from *. 

5. Begin at beginning between the middle of dtc, ch 4, dtc in 
same st, ch 3, dc in same st, ch 3, 2 dtc in same, ch 3, dc in 4th 
st of 7 ch, ch 3, 2 dtc between next 2 dtc, ch 3, 1 dc in same st, 
ch 3, 2 dtc in same place, ch 3, dc in 4th st of 7 ch, ch 3, 2 dtc 
between next 2 dtc, ch 3, dc in same place, ch 3, 2 dtc in same, ch 
3, 1 dc in 4th st of 7 ch, ch 7, 1 dc in 4th st of next 7 ch, and 
repeat. 

6. Begin in 1st dtc, ch 5, dc in 3 ch, * ch 5, dc in next 3 ch, 
repeat. 

7. Dc 5 times in every 5 ch across. 

This is an original design, much more tedious in description than 
in working. It is appropriate for any purpose, and particularly 
pretty for trimming the ends of a scrim scarf for table or bureau. 
May be made in white, gray, or ecru flax thread, according to the 
use for which it is destined. 



30 barbour's prize needle-work series. 

FUCHSIA VINE AND PASSION LEAF LACE. 

PRIZE ARTICLE. 

[Contributed by Miss Annie M. Quackenbush, Warwick, N.Y.J 

Materials : Barbour's flax thread, No. 90, 3-cord, 200-yards spools, 
and a fine steel hook. 
Ch 144 sts, turn. 

1. Miss 6 sts, 4 tc in next 4, * ch 2, miss 2, 1 tc in next, repeat 
from * 4 times, 3 tc in next 3 sts, * ch 2, miss 2, 1 tc in next, re- 
peat from * twice, 6 tc in next 6 sts, * ch 2, miss 2, 1 tc in next, 
repeat from * 21 times, 3 tc in next 3 sts, * ch 2, miss 2, 1 tc in 
next, repeat from * 8 times, 3 tc in next 3 sts, ch 2, miss 2, 1 tc in 
next, ch 5, turn. It will be seen that the pattern is formed of 
squares or spaces, with trebles, the spaces being formed by * ch 2, 
miss 2, 1 tc in next, * and to save unnecessary detail, only the num- 
ber of spaces and trebles will be given hereafter, the latter includ- 
ing the one which helps form the last space. 

2. Tc on each of 4 tc, 9 sp, 10 tc, 4 sp, 13 tc, 2 sp, 4 tc, 9 sp, 
10 tc, 2 sp, 4 tc, 6 sp, 3 tc in 5 ch at end, ch 9, turn. 

3. Miss 6, 4 tc in 3 sts of 9 ch and 1st of following tc, 7 sp, 4 tc, 
1 sp, 16 tc, 9 sp, 31 tc, 1 sp, 4 tc, 1 sp, 4 tc, 8 sp, 4 tc, 1 sp, turn. 

4. Ch 5, 4 tc on tc, 8 sp, 4 tc, 1 sp, 4 tc, 2 sp, 25 tc, 10 sp, 16 
tc, 1 sp, 4 tc, 8 sp, 4 tc under ch at end, turn. 

5. Ch 9, miss 6, 4 tc, 10 sp, 19 tc, 12 sp, 13 tc, 3 sp, 4 tc, 2 sp, 
4 tc, 8 sp, 4 tc, 1 sp, turn. 

6. Ch 5, 4 tc, 7 sp, 4 tc, 3 sp, 7 tc, 21 sp, 16 tc, 9 sp, 4 tc, turn. 

7. Ch 9, miss 6, 4 tc, 1 sp, 4 tc, 7 sp, 28 tc, 17 sp, 10 tc, 3 sp, 
7 tc, 6 sp, 4 tc, 1 sp, turn. 

8. Ch 5, 4 tc, 5 sp, 10 tc, 4 sp, 1.6 tc, 13 sp, 16 tc, 1 sp, 13 tc, 
6 sp, 4 tc, 3 sp, 4 tc, turn. 

9. Ch 9, 4 tc, 2 sp, 4 tc, 2 sp, 4 tc, 5 sp, 13 tc, 1 sp, 16 tc, 13 
sp, 16 tc, 4 sp, 13 tc, 4 sp, 4 tc, 1 sp, turn. 

10. Ch 5, 4 tc, 3 sp, 10 tc, 1 sp, 7 tc, 4 sp, 19 tc, 2 sp, 4 tc, 8 
sp, 16 tc, 1 sp, 10 tc, 7 sp, 4 tc, 3 sp, 4 tc, turn. Now begin to 
decrease the point. 



FUCHSIA VINE AND PASSION LEAF LACE. 31 

ii. Ch 4, 4 tc (missing ist 3 tc), 1 sp, 4 tc, 9 sp, 7 tc, 2 sp, 13 
tc, 9 sp, 19 tc, 5 sp, 4 tc, 1 sp, 4 tc, 1 sp, 10 tc, 3 sp, 4 tc, 1 sp, 
turn. 

The design may be so readily followed from the illustration that it 
is not necessary to give further directions in detail. Four scallops 




Fuchsia Vine and Passion Leaf Lace. 

are formed by the pattern. After the last (65th) row, repeat from 
2d row. 

For the scallop on edge of lace, 7 tc under loop of ch between 
points, fasten with 1 dc between clusters of 4 tc, 12 tc under 2d, 3d, 
and 4th loops, fastening as before between groups of 4 tc, 15 tc 
under 5th loop, 12 tc under 6th, 7th, and 8th loops, then repeat 
from 1 st. 

Only the fuchsia vine may be used, if a narrower lace is desired, 



32 barbour's prize needle-work series. 

or the passion leaf, either with the scallop or point. Laces of this, 
kind are extremely pretty for trimming side-board scarfs, doilies, 
etc., as they may be crocheted on the goods, if preferred, and re- 
semble darned netting. 

A bureau scarf may be made of the crochet work entire, by hav- 
ing a chain of the length desired, working a pattern similar to the 
above on the ends, and filling in the centre with open spaces. Al- 
low, me, however, to suggest that only flax thread be used for such 
elaborate pieces of work, as they are rendered far more beautiful by 
its silkiness of finish, which laundering does not detract from. 



ARLINGTON LACE. 

PRIZE ARTICLE. 

[Contributed by Miss Emily McFarland, Martinsburg, Ohio.] 

Materials : Barbour's flax thread, No. 80, 3-cord, 200-yards spools, 
and a fine steel hook. 

Make a chain as long as desired. 

1. Tc in 5 th st, * ch 1, miss 1, tc in next, repeat from * to end, 
turn. 

2. Dc in every st. 

3. Like 1st row, tc over tc with 1 ch between. 

4. Dc in 1st tc, under igfc 1 ch and in 2d tc, * ch 5, miss 1 tc, 
dtc in next tc, ch 5, miss 1 tc, dc in next tc, under 1 ch and in 
next tc, repeat from * to end, turn. 

5. Ch 8, * dc in ch nearest dtc in last row, in top of dtc, and 
in next ch, ch 3, dtc in 2d of 3 dc in last row, ch 3, repeat from * 
to end, turn. 

6. Ch 3, * dc in ch next 3 dc and in 1st dc, sh of 6 tc in 2d 
dc, dc in next 2 sts, * ch 5, repeat from * to *, ch 5, and repeat to 
end. 

7. Ch 8, * dc in dc nearest sh, ch 1, dc in dc on other side of 
sh, passing behind sh, ch 5, dtc in 3d st of 5 ch in last row, * ch 5, 
repeat from * to *,'ch 5, and repeat to end, dtc at end, turn. 



ARLINGTON LACE. 



33 



8. Dc in dtc and in ch next to dtc, ch 3, * dtc under t ch at 
back of sh, ch 3, dc in ch next dtc, in dtc and in next ch, ch 3, 
repeat from * to * the end. 

Before commencing next row, break off thread and fasten at oppo- 




Arling-ton Lace, 



site end of work. Do this at beginning of 9th, 12th, 15th, and each 
row where shells are to be made, as all must come on the right side. 
Make 9th row like 6th, beginning with sh in 1st group of 3 dc ; 
10th row like 7th, beginning at 1st * ; ch 8 at end, then work nth 
row like 8th. Repeat until the lace is as wide as desired. 
After making last row of sh work back as follows : 
1. Ch 1, 1 tc in each tc of sh, with 1 ch between, ch 1, dc in 3d 
st of 5 ch of last row, repeat to the end, turn. 



34 barbour's prize needle-work series. 

2. Ch 4, dc under i ch, ch 4, dc under next 1 ch, repeat around 
scallop, dc under last ch and under 1st ch of next scallop, then re- 
peat from beginning. 

This lace may be made in any width desired, and is suitable for 
yokes, sleeves, or dress trimming of any description. Insertion to 
match is formed by working the lower edge like the first. Done in 
ecru or gray the lace is especially desirable for trimming dresses of 
wash goods, as laundering, which hardens and stiffens laces made of 
cotton, only adds to the silkiness and beauty of the flax thread 
lace. 



PART 3. -TATTING. 



VESTA LACE. 

PRIZE ARTICLE. 

[Contributed by Mrs. S. B. Wildey, 152 Keap St., Brooklyn, N.Y.] 

Materials : Barbour's flax thread, No. ioo, 3-cord, 200-yards spools, 
and a shuttle. 

1. Make a large ring of 20 dk and 9 p, each separated by 2 dk, 
turn. Make a small ring of 8 dk and 3 p, each separated by 2 dk, 
turn. Make 2d small ring, joining 1st p to 9th p of large ring, turn. 
Make 3d small ring, joining 1st p to 3d or last p of 1st small ring, 
turn. Make large ring, joining by 1st p to small ring. Continue 
this until you have a strip as long as you want your lace. 

2. Make like 1st row, reversed, joining large ring to large ring in 
1 st row as you go along, by 5th or centre p. 

3. Same as 2d row, only joining small rings by 2d or centre p. 

4. Composed of rosettes of 4 rings. To make rosette, 24 dk 
and 7 p, each separated by 3 dk, draw up, make a 2d ring, joining 
to 1 just made, 3d and 4th rings the same ; to join 4th ring to 1st 
ring, pull shuttle thread through between 1st and 2d ring in a large 
loop, pass shuttle through, draw up, then pull shuttle-thread up 



VESTA LACE. 



35 



through last p on 4th ring, then through 1st p on 1st ring, pass 
shuttle through and draw tightly, then break off, fastening end of 
thread to 1st end of ring on wrong side. Make a 2d rosette, join- 
ing 1 st and 2d rings to 2 rings of rosette just made, and 3d ring to 
large ring in lace. Make a 3d wheel, joining to 1st and 4th rings 




Vesta Lace. 



in 2d rosette. You will thus make the rosettes in a zigzag manner, 
1 st in lower row and 2d in top row. 

5 and 6. Same as 1st and 2d rows. 

7. Composed of wheels similar to 4th row, only smaller, each 
ring being made of 16 dk and 7 p, separated by 2 dk. 

The edge is made in exactly the same way, the 4-ring rosettes 
forming the points. 



36 barbour's prize needle-work series. 



PART 4. -MALTESE WORK. 



HAZELTINE LACE. 

PRIZE ARTICLE. 

[Contributed by Della C. Miller, 607 Massachusetts Ave., Washington, D.C.] 

Materials : Barbour's flax thread. No. ioo, 3-cord, 200-yards 
spools, a fine crochet needle, and a hairpin the width you wish to 
make the loops (the smallest size of crochet hairpins), but with 
very stiff prongs, which will not bend. 

1. Make a loop of thread around the pin, holding thread at 
back, pin upwards, and loop near end of prongs. With crochet 
needle in right hand, put hook between prongs, upward under the 
nearest thread, take up thread, draw through, then draw through 
st on hook, forming half the knot. Turn pin over from right to 
left, letting thread pass around prong, and bringing the hook over 
the point of prong to front again, put hook under upper cross thread 
at left of centre, draw thread through, then draw through 2 sts on 
hook. Repeat to the length desired, turning pin over each time. 
As the work proceeds push the loops down toward the round part 
of the pin. 

2. Having made the 1st piece of hairpin work the length you 
want the lace, take it of! the pin and make a ch of sc across the 
top forming the part to sew to whatever the lace is made for. By 
drawing this ch a little snug a beautiful trimming for a round linen 
doily may be had. 

3. Make another hairpin piece 2^ times as long as the 1st piece ; 
be careful not to let it tangle when you remove it from the pin, but 
wind it carefully around a card or envelope. To join the pieces, 
hold the shortest piece for the top, the longest for the bottom; 
* take up 2 loops with 1 sc, 1 loop at a time, on lower piece, ch 3 
sts, take up 4 loops, always 1 at a time, on top piece, ch 3 sts, re- 
peat from * twice, thus making 3 clusters of 4 on top piece ; leave 



HAZELTINE LACE. 



37 



this, and working on lower piece make a ch of * 7 sts, take up 2 
loops, ch 3, take 18 loops, drawing each as tightly as possible, 
fasten back in 1st of 18 loops, draw tight, ch 3, take up 2 loops, ch 
3, fasten back in centre of 7 sts, ch 3, take up 2, ch 3, and take up 
4 loops on top again. Repeat to end. 

4. Bottom row: take up t loop, * ch 9, take up 1, ch 4, take 




Haztltine Lace, 



up 14 (in i st scallop, after this about 20 loops must be taken up), 
drawing each as tightly as possible; fasten back in 1st of 14 loops, 
ch 4, take up 1 loop, ch 4, fasten back in centre of 9 sts, ch 4, take 
up 1, * ch 8, take up 1, repeat from * 7 times, then repeat from 1st 
* until finished. 

This is a very desirable pattern for edging handkerchiefs, doilies, 
etc., dainty, and quickly made. 



DEPARTMENT 2 



PART 1.- KNITTING. 



MITTS. 

PRIZE ARTICLE. 

[Contributed by Mrs. W. A. Evans, 12 High St., New Haven, Conn.] 

Materials : Barbour's flax thread, No. 90, 3-cord, 200-yards spools, 
and 4 steel needles, No. 15. 

Cast on 49 stitches, 16 on each of two needles, and 17 on the 3d. 

1. K 1, o, k 1, o, k 1, o, k 1, o, k 1, p 2 ; repeat. 

2. K 9, p 2 ; repeat. 

3. SI and b, k 5, n, p. 2 ; repeat. 

4. SI and b, k 3, n, p 2 ; repeat. 

This forms a shell; repeat 26 times, forming 27 shells, or accord- 
ing to the length you desire the mitts. 
Knit 6 rows plain. 

115. O, n; repeat all around. 

116. K plain. 

Repeat these rows 4 times, then knit 6 rows plain. 

Begin the shells again, also the thumb. For the thumb make a 
st between 2 sh by taking up a loop ; knit around 4 times ; take up 
other loops each side of the made loop, and continue until you have 
25 sts. Then k around until you come to the gore, take off 25 sts 
on a thread, take up 12 sts to form the gore on top of the thumb, 
k around 2 times, n 2 of the 12 sts, k 10 sts, n 2, do this every 
other time around until the gore is narrowed down. Continue the 
pattern up the hand until the mitt is long enough, then bind off 
loosely. 



MITTS, 



39 



After finishing the mitt, 
pick up the 25 sts, also 
12 sts of the gore, and k 
the thumb, narrowing in same 
way. 

A narrow crocheted edge 
adds to the beauty of the 
mitts, although it may be 
omitted, if desired. A simple 
row of shells is sufficient, 
such as 3 tc in a st, 
with picot between 1st and 
2d tc, miss 2 sts, and re- 
peat. 

These mitts are cool, dur- 
able, and wash beautifully, 
having the ■ lustre of silk 
without some qualities which 
detract from the utility of 
the latter. Let me advise all 
who have never done so to 
try using the flax threads for 
such purposes. 




Mitts. 



TURKISH SLIPPERS. 



PRIZE ARTICLE. 



[Contributed by Lillian L. Carr, 233 W. Canton St., Boston, Mass.] 

Materials: 9 skeins Barbour's Ulster rope linen floss, shade 122, 
size 00, 1 skein size 8, No. 57, and 2 steel needles, No. 17. 

Cast on 6 sts, k plain, then widen each time across for 3 rows, 
making 9 sts. This makes first block. 

Second block : 

1. Pi, widen, k 2, p 3, k 2, widen, p 1. 



40 barbour's prize needle-work series. 

2. K i, p 3, k 3, p 3, k i. 

3. P 1, widen, k 3, p 3, k 3, widen, p 1. 
Third block : 

1. P 2, k 3, p 3,k 3, p 2. 

2. K 2, widen, p 3, k 3, p 3, widen, k 2. 

3- p 3>k 3> P3> k 3, p 3. 

Fourth block : Change as before, purling where knitted plain, and 
knitting plain where purled, without widening. 




BARBOURS PRIZE NEEDLE: WORK 



Turkish Slippers. 

Fifth and sixth blocks: Widen on each end of needle, every 
other time across. 

Seventh block : Knit without widening. 

Continue in this way until you have 21 sts, then k 2 blocks with- 
out widening until you have 39 sts. Knit 2 blocks without widen- 
ing, knit 18 sts and take off, bind off 3 sts on instep, and knit 18 
sts for other side. Knit 32 blocks, then take up sts on other side 
and knit 32 blocks, joining at back of heel. Work a crescent and 
stars on the toe, with the size 8 floss, and a row of stars around the 
upper edge of the slipper. Mount on pointed or Turkish soles, 
which may be cut from heavy leather if they cannot be obtained at 
your shoe-store, in which case it is a good plan to moisten the sole 
and bend it upward, letting it dry in this position. An edge may 
be crocheted around the top, if liked, and ribbon or elastic run in. 
Make a pompon for the top of the floss. Any colors preferred may 
be chosen, and the same size floss used for the stars, etc., as for 



TENNIS BELT. 



41 



the slipper. This pattern may be used for knitting the slipper of 
ordinary fashion, and is very pretty. For slippers, wristlets, neck- 
ties, and many similar articles, I have just begun to use the Ulster 
floss, which is far less expensive than silk, and entirely satisfactory. 



PART 2. -CROCHETING. 



TENNIS BELT. 

PRIZE ARTICLE. 

[Contributed by Miss Barbara Hohnadel, 19S6 3d Ave., New York, N.Y.] 

Materials : Barbour's ecru flax crochet thread, in balls, or 3-cord, 
200-yards spools, No. 30, and steel hook. 
Ch 39. 
1. Miss 1st st, 1 dc in each following st, turn. 




Tennis Belt. 



2, 3, 4. Ch i, i dc in 2d and every succeeding st, working 
through both veins of top loops of the sts. 



42 harbour's prize needle-work series. 

5. Ch 1, miss 1, 1 dc in each of next 3 sts (through top loops), 
then work long loops over the 3 previous rows of dc as follows : 
Push hook through space between 1st and 2d rows made by 1st and 
2d sts, with thread at back of work; draw a long loop through, 
leave it and short loop on hook, miss 2 spaces, draw another long 
loop through next space in same row, and fasten all the loops now 
on hook by 1 sc which will come over 4th st of top row. The 1st 
loop will be oblique and 2d perpendicular. Miss 4th st of top row, 
and make 1 dc in each of next 2 ; then take up 3d long loop 
through space used for 2d long loop, miss 2 spaces, take up 4th 
long loop through next space, fasten with sc over 7th st of top row, 
ending with 2 dc. 

6. Ch 1, miss 1, 1 dc in every remaining st, working only 
through the top loop next you. 

7. 8, 9, 10, 11. Like 6th row, taking through both top loops. 
Repeat from 5 th row, working in this manner until the belt is 

long enough. Line with silk, cotton surah, or other suitable ma- 
terial, if desired, and provide with clasps or hooks and eyes for 
fastening. The belt may be made wider or narrower, as preferred, 
and is improved by the addition of a simple picot edge. 

This stitch I brought from Germany, and the idea of utilizing it 
in this way is my own. 



PICOT POINT DOILY. 

[Contributed by Mrs. A. H. Hall, Detroit, Mich.] 

Materials : Barbour's flax crochet thread, No. 60, in balls, or 3- 
cord, 200-yards spools, and fine steel hook. 
Ch 5, join. 

1. Ch 3, 19 tc in ring, join to top of 3 ch with 1 sc. 

2. Ch 3, 1 tc in 1st st and 2 in each succeeding tc, making 40 
tc in all, join to top of 3 ch. 

3> 4j 5? 6, 7> 8, 9, 10. Like 2d row, widening sufficiently to 
make the mat lie flat. The last row has 143 sts. 

11. Ch 3, 10 tc in following 10 tc, ch 6, make a picot by fas- 



PICOT POINT DOILY. 



43 



tening back in 5 th st with 1 sc, ch 1, miss 2 tc of last row, 1 1 tc 
in next 1 1 tc ; repeat from *all around, joining last 1 ch to top of 3 
ch at beginning. 

12. 1 sc over next tc, ch 3, 8 tc over next 8 tc, picot as in last 
row, ch 1, tc in picot of last row, picot as before (always by 6 ch, 




Picot Point Doily, 



fastened back in 5th st, and 1 ch), tc in picot of last row, picot, 
miss 1 tc, 9 tc on 9 tc, and repeat around, joining last picot to top 



of 3 ch. 



13. 1 sc in next tc, ch 3, 6 tc in next 6 tc, picot, tc on 1st tc in 
open point, picot, tc in picot of last row, picot, tc in same place, 
picot, tc on next tc, picot, miss 1st tc, 7 tc on 7 tc, and repeat 
around, joining to top of 3 ch as before. 



44 barbour's prize needle-work series. 

14. Like 13th row, with 5 tc in solid point and 7 picots in open 
point. 

15. Like 13th row, with 3 tc in solid point, and 9 picots 
between. 

16. Like 13th row, 1 tc in solid point, and 11 picots between. 
I took the idea for this doily from " Picot Collar" in No. 2 of 

the Prize Series of Needlework. It is very pretty, easily made, and 
durable. May be made larger if desired, by enlarging the centre 
and having the base of the points consist of a larger number of tc. 
Worked with flax macrame or No. 18 flax ciochet thread the design 
would make very desirable table mats. I presume all ladies know 
that, particularly for these table accessories, the flax threads are as 
much to be preferred as is linen damask to cotton cloth. 



ROSE TIDY. 

PRIZE ARTICLE. 

[Contributed by Mrs. M. J. Stratton, Caribou, Me.] 

Materials : 3 balls Barbour's Irish flax crochet and lace thread, 
No. 35 (or 3-cord, 200-yards spools), ecru, and steel hook of 
medium size. 

Ch 192 sts. 

1. Ch 2, 191 tc. 

2. 3 tc, 62 sp, 3 tc. 

3. 3 tc, 1 sp, 9 tc, 3 sp, 21 tc, 2 sp, 18 tc, 18 sp, 18 tc, 2 sp, 21 
tc, 3 sp, 9 tc, 1 sp, 3 tc. 

4. 3 tc, 1 sp, 3 tc, 1 sp, 3 tc, 3 sp, 3 tc, 5 sp, 3 tc, 2 sp, 3 tc, 
4 sp, 3 tc, 18 sp, 3 tc, 4 sp, 3 tc, 2 sp, 3 tc, 5 sp, 3 tc, 3 sp, 3 tc, 1 
sp, 3 tc, 1 sp, 3 tc. 

5. 3 tc, 1 sp, 30 tc, 2 sp, 3 tc, 2 sp, 3 tc, 2 sp, 3 tc, 22 sp, 3 tc, 

2 sp, 3 tc, 2 sp, 3 tc, 2 sp, 30 tc, 1 sp, 3 tc. 

6. 3 tc, 3 sp, 3 tc, 3 sp, 3 tc, 5 sp, 21 tc, 22 sp, 21 tc, 5 sp, 3 

tc, 3 S P> 3 tc, 3 S P> 3 tc. 

7. 3 tc, 3 sp, 3 tc, 3 sp, 3 tc, 5 sp, 12 tc, 3 sp, 3 tc, 28 sp, 3 tc, 

3 sp, 1 2 tc, 1 sp, 3 tc, 3 sp, 3 tc, 3 sp, 3 tc. 




Rose Tidy. 



46 



BARBOUR S PRIZE NEEDLE-WORK SERIES. 



8. 3 tc, 3 sp, 3 tc, 3 sp, 3 tc, i sp, 3 tic, 2 sp, 3 tc, 3 sp, 3 tc, 4 

sp, 3 tc, 16 sp, 3 tc, 6 sp, 3 tc, 3 sp, 3 itq, 2 sp, 3 tc, 1 sp, 3 tc, 3 
sp, 3 tc, 3 S P> 3 tc. 




Chair- Arm Cover 



In this row the spray of roses is begun. Perhaps it should be 
specified for the benefit of those who have not Nos. 1 and 2 of the 



MACRAME FRINGE, IN CROCHET. 47 

Prize Series, that a space (sp) is formed by 2 tc separated by 2 ch, 
in the solid work every st being filled by a tc. The tidy being 
worked in the same way throughout, it seems hardly necessary to 
give details, as the pattern may be readily followed from the illustra- 
tion. If preferred, the lower corners may be repeated at the top 
instead of the border. Finish the top as begun by a row of sp 
then a row of tc. Cut threads for fringe 10 inches long, double 
them and tie 2 (4 double) in every other st. The fringe may be 
knotted, tied in tassels, or left plain. 

For the chair-arm cover to match tidy : 

Ch 129 sts. 

1. (9 tc, 1 sp,) 10 times, 9 tc. 

2. (3 tc, 1 sp,) 21 times, 3 tc. 

3. 15 tc, 1 sp, (9 tc, 1 sp,) 8 times, 15 tc. 

4. 2 sp, 3 tc, 37 sp, 3 tc, 2 sp. 

Continue in this way, as shown by the model, for 23 rows, the 
20th being like 4th, 21st like 3d, 2 2d like 2d, and 23d like 1st. 
Care must be taken to ch 3 at end of every row, to turn, this repre- 
senting 1 tc. Knot in the fringe as directed. 

Any cross-stitch pattern can be taken off in crochet. Table-mats 
and centre-pieces are now being made in this way, which may be 
called "a new use for an old fashion." They are frequently lined 
with a delicate color, harmonizing with other table accessories, this 
being removed when the articles are laundered. It seems un- 
necessary to emphasize the fact that flax threads alone should be 
chosen for such work. A centre-piece recently seen was crocheted 
of squares or spaces, then darned in with different stitches, resem- 
bling antique or guipure netting. 



MACRAME FRINGE, IN CROCHET. 

PRIZE ARTICLE. 

[Contributed by Nellie A. Hines, Washburn, Me.] 

Materials : Barbour's macrame flax thread, in balls, 5 -cord, No. 
16, and macrame hook, medium size. 



48 



BARBOUR S PRIZE NEEDLE-WORK SERIES. 



Make a ch of the length desired. 
i. Tc in every st of ch. 

2. Ch 5, miss 2 tc, * 1 tc in next, ch 2, miss 2, and repeat 
from.* 




Macrame Fringe, in Crochet. 



3. Tc in every st, making 3 ch for 1st tc. 

4. Like 2d row. 

For the fringe, take strands 26 inches long; knot 4 strands in 
each sp — making 8 threads in each sp. Take 4 threads from each 
strand to knot. Begin each point with 5 knots, and decrease 1 
knot each row, finishing the point with 1 knot in 5th row. 



DRAPERY CHAINS AND SHADE PULL. 



49 



This is one of the simplest fringes and can be varied almost in- 
definitely. For a rug fringe the heading may be only half as wide, 
and the strands shorter, making but i or 2 rows of knots across. 
Fringe made in this way of the Ulster rope linen floss, size o or 00 is 
beautiful for trimming table-covers. A denim table-cover embroid- 
ered with the floss and trimmed with fringe, as noted, is extremely 
effective and not at all expensive. Denim portieres may have a 
frieze fringe like that described, made of the Ulster floss in 2 shades 
or many, as liked. 



DRAPERY CHAINS AND SHADE PULL. 

PRIZE ARTICLE, -r 

[Contributed by Mrs. A. W. Stratton, Framingham, Mass.] 

Materials : 4 skeins Barbour's Ulster Rope Linen floss, size o, 
shade 57, 28 brass rings J inch in diameter, one ring ij inch in 
diameter, a screw-ring to fasten into the shade, and a large crochet 
hook, such as is used for macrame. 




Drapery Chains and Shade Pull, 



Fasten in one of the small rings and make 1 2 dc, leaving half the 
ring uncovered ; * take another ring, make 1 2 dc in this, bringing 



50 barbour's prize needle-work series. 

it close to the last ring; repeat from * until you have 12 or 14 rings 
according to the length you want the chain. Go entirely around 
the last ring with 24 dc, 1 sc between rings, 12 dc in next ring, and 
so continue until all are filled. If desired, a ribbon may be run 
in and out the rings, or the centres may be filled with a " spider," 
crossing threads from side to side and weaving a little circle in the 
middle. In such case the first and last rings should be left unfilled 
to slip over the hook. 

For the pull, cover the large ring with the floss taken double. 
Take 7 yards, double it, fasten the ends with a very small knot, and 




Drapery Chains and Shade Pull. 

begin at this end. Work around the ring, leaving room for 2 or 
3 dc, then make a double ch for the cord, taking first one thread, 
then the other. Work up all but a few inches of the floss, slip on 
the screw-ring, make 3 dc on the ring, and carry the f-inch loop 
that may remain along, by drawing neatly through the top of dc on 
the ring. This fastens all securely. Then braid a little knot in the 
centre of the cord, and you have a dainty and inexpensive " window 
set," which may be made to match any furnishings. 

A sleeve-holder, made of two rings covered as described, and 
with a double chain cord between of about 25 inches, is a very use- 
ful little article. Slip one ring over the thumb, wind the cord tightly 
around the sleeve it is designed to hold, while pulling on coat or 
blazer, slip the other ring over the same thumb, and there will be no 
more wry faces over sleeves that " won't stay down." These hold- 
ers, etc., may be made of linen macrame, if desired, but are much 
prettier of the floss. Indeed, I should like to suggest that the latter 
is beautiful for covering rings to make photograph frames, baskets, 
and the thousand and one little articles which are formed in this way. 



ROSE SPRAY APPLIQUE, 



51 



ROSE SPRAY APPLIQUE. 

PRIZE ARTICLE. 

[Contributed by Ida F. Wildey, 152 Keap St., Brooklyn, X.Y.] 

Materials : Barbour's Ulster rope linen floss, size oo, shades Nos. 
11 and 12 for leaves, and No. 112 for roses, with crochet hook of 
medium size. 




Rose Spray Applique.. 

Ch 18 sts, turn. 

First leaf : Dc in each of 6 sts, ch 1, turn : dc in 1st st, tc in next, 
2 tc in each of next 2, dc in next, dc in tip, ch 2, dc in same st, 



52 barbour's prize needle-work series. 

proceed in same way on other side of leaf, turn; ch 2, dc in each 
next 2, repeat twice, ch 2, dc in tip, ch 2, dc in tip, repeat on other 
side, dc in bottom of leaf, dc in ch, turn. 

Second leaf : Ch 18 sts, turn; dc in 8 sts, ch 1, turn; dc in 1st st, 
tc in next, 2 tc in next, 2 dtc in each of next 2, dtc and tc in next, 
tc in next, dc in tip, ch 2, dc in same, same other side, turn; ch 2, 
dc in next 2, 6 times, ch 2, dc in same, other side same, dc in bot- 
tom of leaf and in 1st st on stem, turn. 

Third leaf : Ch 21, turn; dc 10 times, turn; dc in 1st, tc in next 
2, tc and dtc in next, 2 dtc in each of next 2, dtc and tc in next, tc 
in next, dc in next, dc in tip, ch 2, dc in tip, same on other side, 
make notched edge as on other leaves, by 2 dc separated by 2 ch. 

Fourth leaf: Ch 21, turn; dc in next 12, turn; ch 1, dc in 1st 
st, tc in next, tc and dtc in next, 2 dtc in next 6, 2 tc in next, 1 tc 
in next, dc in next, dc in tip, ch 2, dc in tip, other side same, dc in 
bottom, make notched edge as before. 

Fifth leaf : Dc in 9 next sts on stem, ch 12, turn ; dc in 10, and 
proceed like 3d leaf, dc along stem until opposite 2d leaf, make 6th 
leaf like 2d, and 7th like 1st; 

Rose : Make ring of 5 ch, and 5 loops in ch of 3 ch each ; in each 
loop, to form petals, ch 3, 12. dtc, ch 3, fasten in ring with dc ; for 
the bud, same as rose, then fasten down the petals with invisible sts 
to resemble half-opened rose. 

Stem : Ch 45 sts — fasten with dc on under side of bud, turn, dc 
in next 20 sts, ch 12, fasten on under side of rose, dc in next 12 sts, 
proceed in same way to end of stem, fasten left-hand leaf 12 sts from 
end of stem, and other leaf on opposite side of stem 18 sts from last 
end. Use the 2 shades of olive in nearly every leaf, making half or 
two-thirds dark and remainder light, or the reverse, or simply making 
a few sts or notches of different shade ; a dark vein through light leaf 
is pretty, or arranged as fancy dictates. Placed on a background of 
dark-green felt, the stem of one hidden under the leaf below, these 
appliques are very effective. Do not fasten flat, but allow them to 
retain their natural curve. For screens, tidies, panels, etc., etc., they 
have a rich appearance, and are easily made. For 2 appliques 7 
skeins will be required, 1 of pink, 6 of light and dark olive. 



RIBBED HOUSE-SLIPPERS. 



53 



RIBBED HOUSE-SLIPPERS. 

[Contributed by E. F. Fitch, 5S Olive St., New Haven, Conn.] 

Materials : Barbour's flax embroidery floss, size o, and steel or 
bone crochet-hook large enough to carry the thread. For a sole 




Ribbed House-Slippers. 

No. 2 or No. 38 or 10 skeins will be needed, of 2 contrasting or 
harmonizing colors. 

The ribbed work is the same as that in reversible table mats, on 
page 42 of Book, No. 1 in this series. 

Ch 6 sts, turn; 2 dc in 1st st, 1 dc in each of next 3, 2 dc in 
last, 2 dc in next st on other side of ch, 1 dc in each of next 3 (in 



54 barbour's prize needle-work series. 

same sts as on other side of ch), and 2 dc in last; now turn the 
piece and work back again in same way, 2 dc in 1st, 2 dc in middle 
st, beginning to form a point, and 1 dc in sts between. Always be 
careful to take up the back loop of st. Continue this way, widen- 
ing at the ends till you have 7 ribs, then make the 2 dc only at 
beginning of every other row, and in point of each row, for 14 ribs, 
when you should have- 36 sts, forming toe of slipper. For the side 
work up 12 sts, then go back and forth without widening till the 
strip is long enough to reach to the middle of heel of sole. For 
other side fasten in 12th st from the side, and crochet 12 sts, 
making the ribs to correspond with those on 1st side, only to make 
the colors alternate where joined at heel it is necessary to have 1 
ridge less on this side. As you crochet across and back do not 
break off the color, but keep 2 balls going. Join at back of heel by 
sewing or crocheting together, and for a finish around top put 1 tc 
in every other rib, with 3 ch between. Under each 3 ch work 1 dc, 
2 tc, 1 dc. Through the holes in 1st row run an elastic, and 
over this a ribbon tied with a bow on top of toe, if wanted particu- 
larly attractive. These slippers, made of Barbour's floss, are pleas- 
ant to wear in summer as well as winter, while those of worsted are 
unpleasantly warm for summer wear. A plain cork sole is to be 
preferred to fleece-lined ones for summer wear. 



REINS, FOR CHILDREN. 

PRIZE ARTICLE. 

[Contributed by Miss A. M. Fitch, New Haven, Conn.] 

Materials : Ulster rope linen floss, size o, 7 skeins No. 70, 8 skeins 
No. 52, and 9 skeins No. 57, with a bone or steel crochet hook, 
medium size. 

Ch 10, evenly and rather loosely, join, taking care the ring is not 
twisted. 

Hold ring between 1st finger and thumb, put hook in back st of 
ch and draw thread through both sts ; repeat around. Now crochet 
round and round ; the little st in which the needle should go each 



REINS, FOR CHILDREN. 



00 



time is on the back or outside of the work, between 2 other sts 
that almost hide it. The spiral effect will be seen after a few rows. 
When you hold your work with a st on needle and insert latter in 




Reins, for Children. 



next st, the thread which you now draw through forms the little st 
for succeeding row ■ so if you take the trouble to follow with sewing- 
needle and thread, catching into this st until you have been around 
once, you cannot miss the st next time, and will wonder that you 
did at first. It is a little difficult to describe, but very simple and 
rather fascinating work. The reins are 2^ yards long, and the 
3 colors are used alternately. Odds and ends of the floss left from 
embroidery work may be utilized in this way, if preferred, or any 
colors chosen. A cross-piece, 9 or 10 inches, goes across the front, 
and to this bells are attached. Use for this the 3 extra skeins, Nos. 
57 and 52. Bows of ribbon may be added where this is joined. 
All reins stretch more or less, though these of Ulster floss are less 
liable to than those of other material ; to avoid this a heavy twine 
may be run through, covering your bodkin with silk so it will not 



56 barbour's prize needle-work series. 

catch on the sts. But 16 skeins of Ulster floss are required for flat 
reins, crocheted in afghan st, casting on 10 sts for width and using 
a good-sized crochet needle. These reins are very pretty fastened); 
to the baby's carriage, and particularly bright and silky when made! 
of this floss, now to be had in lovely shades of all desirable colors. 
•In fact, they must be seen to be appreciated, as the illustration can \ 
give but little idea of their beauty. 



PART 3. -TATTING. 



DRESS YOKE. 

PRIZE ARTICLE. 

[Contributed by Emma S. Thomas, Schoharie, N.Y.] 

Materials : Barbour's flax crochet thread, No. 60, (or3-cord, 200- 
yards spools, as preferred,) and an ordinary tatting shuttle. 

1 . To make the diamond or wheel, begin in the centre ; 1 dk, 
1 p, (leaving the loop 1-4 inch long at least,) repeat until there are 
10 p, and close. 

2. Outside of wheel, 4 p separated by 1 dk, close, allow 1-4 
inch of thread, and join to centre wheel. Repeat around. 

3. To shape yoke, make 4 rows of wheels of 10 wheels in length, 
then 3 rows of 18 across; on each end of the 18 make 1 row of 7, 
and 2 of 6 wheels. The wheels are joined by 1 p on 1 side and 2 
p on the other side of the wheels, joining so that the wheels going 
around the form are joined by 2 p, and those up and down by 1. 

4. To make the frill for the edge, make 57 wheels as described, 
joining by 2 loops at the sides. 

5. Heading for frill : 3 p, separated by 1 dk, joining these small 
wheels at sides ; between each wheel allow 1-2 inch of thread, join- 
ing to large wheel by centre p of each small wheel on the upper side 
of large wheel, and also the 2 p between the large wheels. Con- 
tinue this until 3 rows of heading are made, when with shuttle and 




Dress Yoke. 



58 barbour's prize needle-work series. 

thread join to yoke, allowing 1-4 inch of thread between each join- 
ing. Finish around neck and down edge of front with small wheels 
like those around the outer edge of large wheels, joined the same as 
heading. 

Sleeves may be made of the same wheels, making the upper half 
of them like the yoke and the narrow, lower half like the frill about 
the yoke. 

Made in this way, tatting is very "lacey" looking and rapidly 
done. 



SOFA-PILLOW COVER. 

PRIZE ARTICLE. 

[Contributed by Jennie R. Welch, Lawrence, Kansas."} 

Materials : Barbour's flax thread, ecru or white, as preferred, Nos. 
60 and 80, 3-cord, 200-yards spools, and 2 shuttles. 

1. The section shown is -J of the cover, the rosette in centre 
being completed. Work this first, with No. 60, and 2 threads. 
Make a ring of 1 dk, 10 p, each separated by 2 dk, 1 dk, close and 
fasten off. Make small ring of 7 dk, join to p of ring just made, 7 
dk, close ; reverse the work, using 2 threads, 5 dk ; ring of 7 dk, 
9 p, each separated by 2 dk, 7 dk, close ; then with 2 threads again 
(which are always used in connecting), 5 dk ; * turn work, with 1 
thread work 7 dk, join to next p of middle ring, 7 dk, close ; turn 
work, 5 dk with both threads, ring of 7 dk, join to last p of previous 
ring, 2 dk and 1 p, alternately 8 times, 7 dk, close, 5 dk with both 
threads, repeat from * all around, joining last p of last large ring to 
1 st p of 1 st ring, and fasten off. Work connecting scallops on outer 
edge with both threads ; * fasten to p forming connection between 
rings of round just worked, make scallop of 13 times alternating 2 
dk, 1 p, then 2 dk, repeat from * 9 times more. 

2. Work 10 smaller rosettes to surround this, with No. 80 flax 
thread. Beginning in centre, 5 dk, 1 p, 5 dk, close, repeat 4 times, 
and fasten off; work next round alternately with 1 and 2 threads; 
join to p of centre, 3 dk with 2 threads, ring of 4 dk, 5 p, each sep- 
arated by 2 dk, 4 dk, close ; * turn ring downward, 6 dk with 2 



SOFA-PII.LOW COVER, 



59 



threads, work upward again, make a ring as before, but instead of 
forming ist p join to last p of previous ring; turn work, 3 dk with 
2 threads, join to next p of centre, 3 dk, turn work and make a ring 
as before, making last p of each ring longer than the others ; repeat 





c^gl^^. 




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w^^® 




s$p 


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«i^ • 


^MTt 


Kf V^mS^tw^lxtf 9#IKfft^W- • 


J0Ptw&^ 


^#» ocTV^P^^^o <>£. rA was ^p^cSPac 


■ •.'jCy spiff ^JWS^Mt^l^t^^^m^m ^W^^W^Sfm^s^m 




barbour's prize needle work book no. 3. 1 



Sofa-Pillow Cover, 

from * all around, joining last p of last ring to ist p of ist ring. 
Work scallops with 2 threads, 2 dk, 1 p, 7 times, 2 dk. Join the 10 
rosettes in circle by means of little 3-leaved figures, of No. 60 flax 
thread, each ring of 5 dk, 7 p, each separated by 2 dk, then 5 dk, 
repeat twice, fasten off. The groups around the outer edge of 10 
rosettes are worked with No. 8o, as is all the rest. All 3-leaved 
figures are worked alike. The 4-leaved figures in centre of strip are 



60 barbour's prize needle-work series. 

of 5 dk, i p, 5 dk, close, repeat 3 times, and fasten off; for the 
heading, toward centre, join to p of 4-leaved figure, with 2 threads 
do 3 dk, then a ring of 3 dk, 4 p, each separated by 2 dk, 3 dk, * 
turn ring downward, with both threads do 3 dk, join to next p of 4- 
leaved figure, 3 dk, turn work, make a ring as before, joining to last 
p of previous ring instead of forming 1st p, turn again, 3 dk with 2 
threads, join to 1st p of another figure, 3 dk, turn work, make a 
ring as before, and repeat from * all across, making 7 rings. Outer 
part is like inner, with 5 instead of 4 p in rings. Work 10 strips, 
then join together and to other part of cover by little rosettes ; 1 
dk, 8 p, each separated by 2 dk, 1 dk, close and join thread in 1st 
p, * 4 dk, 5 p, each separated by 2 dk, 4 dk, close, join thread to 
next p, and repeat from * all around, joining last to 1st ring. With 
both threads, fasten between 2 rings, * 2. dk, 7 p, each separated by 
2 dk, 2 dk, join between next two rings, and repeat from * all 
around. Join the rosettes to the strips and 3-leaved figures by p. 
For outside of cover longer strips are worked in same way, needing 
12 4-leaved figures, and in working outer half between 6th and 7th 
figures, work 2 rings with small scallop between them of 6 dk ; this 
insertion has a row of scallops added, using both threads, each of 2 
dk, 9 p, each separated by 2 dk, 2 dk. These strips are also joined by 
means of the small rosettes, worked as before directed. Between 
the rosettes in the 2 rows of insertion are joined small ovals made 
of 3 of the 4-leaved figures surrounded with rings and small scallops 
worked as directed for outer half of insertion. The open spaces 
between are filled with ovals and 3-leaved figures. Work ovals as 
follows : 6 dk, 7 p, each separated by 2 dk, 6 dk, close, repeat 5 
times, forming 6-leaved figure, fasten off, work 2 3-leaved figures, 
join to opposite rings, surrounding these figures with 24 rings and 
scallops, worked as directed for outer half of insertion. Groups of 
3-leaved figures are joined to these ovals and to other parts of cover, 
as shown. Tie all threads firmly and cut as closely as possible ; 
never tie, however, when the figures may be joined. in working. A 
pretty lamp-shade can be made by leaving off the centre wheel and 
lining with colored silk, and the wheels, insertion, etc., can be 
worked separately and used for different purposes. 



DEPARTMENT 3 



PART 1.- NETTING, 



PARASOL COVER. 

PRIZE ARTICLE. 

[Contributed by Mrs. W. L. Gavett, 17 Sanford Ave., Plainfield, N.J.] 

Materials : Barbour's flax thread, No. 80, 3 -cord, 200-yards spools, 
and an ordinary fine netting needle; requires 10 or 11 spools. 

Pin a string to your knee, net 24 meshes on this, and join last st 
to 1st to form circle. Net 3 rows around, each over a stick as large 
as two knitting needles. 

Next, once round, into each loop, over knitting-needle. Then 
into each of above, around pencil, all around. Next round, 4 times 
in 1, over needle; 3 rows plain, over needle; next row, go in 1 mesh 
7 times, over pencil, then 3 plain, alternating all around ; 3 rows, 
all around, over knitting-needle ; 1 row, go into each mesh, over 
pencil ; then over needle, and take up 6 meshes, netting 3 plain 
between, alternating all around ; then 3 rows over needle ; net into 
each mesh 5 times, over pencil ; 3 rows over needle ; next row, over 
pencil into each mesh ; 4 into each mesh all around ; 4 rows over 
needle. 

Continue repeating the above directions until large enough for 
parasol. Finish edge by the more solid line, all around, then go 
into a mesh 12 times, skip 3, alternating all around; then go into 
each of 12, over needle, and when you come to the three sts take 
one, draw thread through and net it. This forms the scallop. Con- 
tinue this, finishing with three rows over knitting-needle. 

The lower edge of this cover forms a beautiful lace for various 



62 barbour's prize needle-work series. 




Parasol Cover. 



purposes, trimming the shade of a banquet lamp, etc., also a lovely 
lamp-shade, to be lined with some delicate color, is made of it in 
much the same manner as the cover. Suggestions for manifold uses 
readily come to the worker. 



BABY S CAP. 



63 



BABY'S CAP. 

PRIZE ARTICLE. 

[Contributed by Mrs. Henry W. Rankin, Plainfield, N.J.] 

Materials : Barbour's flax thread, No. 80, 3 -cord, 200-yards 
spools, and a fine steel netting-needle. 

Cast on 25 loops, using fine knitting-needle for mesh. 




Baby's Cap. 



Net around 3. times, using fine needle for mesh ; then, over large 
mesh (No. 11), net 5 in 1 loop, 4 in next 4, and so on; next row, 
plain, over knitting-needle \ next plain, over large mesh ; * 10 times 



64 barbour's prize needle-work series. 

in i loop, plain in next 3, and so on, using large mesh ; plain, over 
needle ; plain, over large mesh ; net 8 together, plain in 4, and so 
on, over needle ; repeat from * ; net 5 in each mesh, all around ; 
plain, over knitting-needle, net 5 together, over large mesh, all 
around. 

Repeat above till cap is large enough, but stop off at end of next 
lines to shape neck, turn netting over and return. 

Border : Net plain, over knitting-needle, all around ; net 12 times 
in 1, then 3 plain, over large mesh; net over knitting-needle into 
each of 12, take middle of plain 3, draw through upper mesh and 
net it. This forms a scallop ; net plain 2 or 3 times into each 
mesh. 



ANTIQUE SQUARE. 

PRIZE ARTICLE. 

[Contributed by A. M. Fitch, New Haven, Conn.] 

Materials : Barbour's Irish flax crochet and lace thread, Nos. 25, 
40, and 70, in balls (or 3 -cord, 200-yards spools), J^-inch mesh, and 
netting-needle. A detailed description of this work seems unneces- 
sary, the foundation being of square netting, filled in as plainly 
shown in the design. Books No. 1 and No. 2 of the Prize Series 
contain directions for netting and several articles on this lace, but I 
think none that show the readiness with which ordinary cross-stitch 
embroidery patterns may be adapted to it. Take for example the 
initial " B " in the tidy shown. Each mesh of the netting that forms 
the letter represents a cross-stitch in the pattern. Any one may 
easily originate designs, monograms, etc., by ruling off into squares 
a large sheet of plain paper and marking out a design or letter, using 
a X in the meshes or squares intended to be darned in, heavy lines 
where the thick or heavy work is to be made, and leaving plain the 
squares that are to be filled in with the lace stitch. When a little 
trouble is taken in marking it out on the paper, it will be found 
pleasant work transferring it with thread to the netting. The heavy- 



ANTIQUE SQUARE, 



65 



work sprays in the corners were worked without a pattern, the ist 
being taken as a guide for 2d, 3d, and 4th. The netting for this 




Antique Square. 



tidy was made with No. 40 flax thread, the darning was done with 
the same number, the filling- in or lace stitch with No. 70, and the 
heavy work with No. 25. This work is so beautiful and durable that 
it is small wonder it is popular ; it should, however, always be done 
with the flax threads, never with cotton. 



66 barbour's prize needle-work series. 

LADY'S TIE. 

PRIZE ARTICJL.E. 

[Gontributed by Mrs. A. H. Hall, 1367 Antoine St., Detroit, Mich.] 

Materials : Barbour's flax thread, No, ioo, 3 -cord, 200-yards 
spools, a netting needle, and meshes of two sizes. 

1. Having filled the needle, net 54 sts diamond mesh, directions 
for making which are given in No. 1 of Barbour's Prize Series, 
page 57, using a small mesh, say an ordinary knitting-needle, No. 17. 




Lady's Tie. 

This strip, 54 sts. wide, should be long enough to go around the 
neck and tie in a bow. 

For the border, or ends : 

2. Using a mesh large enough to make the loops y 2 inch long, 
net 3 sts in every other st of last row, all the way across. 



MACRAME WORK. 67 

3. With small mesh net across 6 times, taking every st of last 
row. 

4. With large mesh, net 3 sts in every other st all the way 
across. 

5. With small mesh, net across 8 times, taking every st. 

6. With large mesh, net 3 sts in? every other st. 

7. With small mesh, net 6 times across, taking every st. 

8. With large mesh, net 3 times in every other st. 

g. With small mesh, net across 3 times, taking every st. 

Make the other end the same. This is simple, but very dainty. 
Netted of No. 40 or No. 50 Barbour's flax crochet thread (or spool 
thread), ecru or gray, using meshes proportionately larger, it makes 
a beautiful drape. 



PART 2.— MACRAME. 



MACRAME WORK. 



The word " Macrame " is from the Arabic, signifying a fringe, 
lace, or trimming, and is generally applied to knotted lace, as dis- 
tinguished from that produced by the use of needles, bobbins, etc. 
The manifold uses to which it is applicable, and the great variety of 
combinations possible, render it a most fascinating though easy 
study, and ladies everywhere will be delighted that it is again in high 
favor. Although centuries old, it is worthy of remark that this 
beautiful work was quite unknown in this country until its intro- 
duction some twenty years ago by the Barbour Brothers Company, 
by whom, also, the macrame flax-threads were first prepared. Its 
partial decline in popularity was due to the forcing upon the market 
of cotton twines, and their substitution in many cases for the flax 
macrame \ the former were soon entirely discarded, it being found 
that they untwisted and rumpled easily, were hard to use, soiled even 
before the work was completed, and in fact lacked all the desirable 
qualities of linen. Barbour's Irish flax threads, in all numbers and 



68 



BARBOUR S PRIZE NEEDLE-WORK SERIES. 



sizes, according to the use for which the work is designed, are 
especially adapted to macrame' work, possessing durability and a rich 
silkiness of finish which renders it a pleasure to handle them, and 
gives the completed work a beauty which is added to by laundering 
rather than lost, as in the case of cotton threads. 

DIRECTIONS. 

The knots shown at fig. i are among the most simple. First, at 
the left, is the '"single chain," formed of 2 single threads, knotted 




Fig. 1. 



alternately, each serving as " leader " or cord to the other. Double 
chain is made in the same way, using double threads. Open chain 
is formed also of 4 threads; take 1st and 2d, on left, *hold 1st in 
right hand, knot 2d on it twice, pass to left hand, knot same thread 
as before on it twice, repeat with next 2 threads from *, then, hold- 
ing leader still in left hand, knot 1st leader on it twice with right 



Barbour's patent macrame lace desk. 69 

hand, then knot remaining thread at left twice on it, leaving a space 
or loop of thread before drawing up tight. * Pass same leader back 
to right hand, knot same thread on it twice with left hand ; take up 
2 threads at the right side, hold under thread in right- hand, as 
leader, knot the other twice on it, leaving loop as before. Pass same 
leader to left hand, knot same thread twice on it, and holding leader 
still in left hand, knot leader at left side twice on it. Then knot 
remaining thread at left side on it, leaving a loop, pass leader back 
to right hand, knot same thread on it, and repeat. Solomon's knot, 
sometimes called flat knot, is perhaps more frequently used than any 
other. Take 4 threads, hold 2 centre ones straight, pass thread at 
left loosely over these, pass the right thread over this, under the 
centre ones, up through the loop at left side, and draw up tight ; 
this forms what is sometimes called single flat knot. Repeat, begin- 
ning with right thread, and draw up to meet 1st half of knot, forming 
the Solomon's knot or double flat knot. Looped picots are made 
of these knots, leaving a space of thread between each ; knotted 
picots in the same way, a single knot being tied in the space left 
for the picot before making the 2d Solomon's knot. To bring this 
knot in the right place, make it on a big pin and draw it close to 
the preceding Solomon's knot before taking out the pin. Other 
knots are shown in patterns where used. 

The length of threads depends much upon their size and quality 
— a knot will take up less of a fine, pliable thread than of a coarse, 
stiff one. Care should be taken not to slacken the horizontal cord 
upon which the knots are formed, and which should be double 
threads, cut the length of the fringe or lace required. The work- 
ing threads may be knotted upon this by looping over it, or attached 
to the pegs at top of desk, first. 



BARBOUR'S PATENT MACRAME LACE DESK, m 

This desk (fig. 2), patented by the Barbour Brothers Company 
some years ago, has never been improved upon, and accompanying 
it are all accessories for macrame' work save those always at hand, 



70 



BARBOUR'S PRIZE NEEDLE-WORK SERIES, 



scissors, measure, etc. It is about 9 X 18 inches in size, orna- 
mental, and so light as to be easily carried ; and with this and a 
supply of flax macrame, any lady will be able to add continually to 
her store of household decoration. The pattern on the desk is very 
pretty for chair-backs, lambrequins, or any desired purpose. Cut 
the threads 40 inches long, using 8 -cord macrame, in balls ; double 
them over pegs at top of desk, linking right cord with left ; make a 




E W0 «K Book N0 . 3 



Barbour's Patent Macrame Lace Desk. 



row of Solomon's knots ; carry a horizontal cord across, 2d peg from 
top, wind each thread around twice, forming a rib, carry the 9th 
thread across, diagonally, to left, and wind 8 preceding threads 
around, also around 2d horizontal cord, 5th peg below 1st; repeat 
across, then make a row of " collecting knots," which are simply 
Solomon's knots around 4 threads instead of 2 ; make a whole knot, 
and a half; then a rib 6th peg below last; then 3 rows of mosaic 
work, made as follows : 1 half-knot (Solomon's), then a single knot 
in centre threads, close to half-knot, then a whole (Solomon's), knot. 
Repeat across. Next row, miss 2 threads, and next row take them 
in, in order to bring the work in diamonds. Next, a horizontal rib, 
then a row of collecting knots, which resemble drawn-work, then 
another rib. This pattern is rapidly worked and very effective. It 
may be varied as preferred. In the Macrame" Lace Book published 
by the Barbour Brothers Company, will be found more than twenty 
beautiful patterns, fully described and illustrated, suitable for the 
various purposes to which this work is applied. 



MACRAME FRINGE. 



71 




Macrame Fringe, 



MACRAME FRINGE. 

Materials : Barbour's flax macrame, 5 -cord, No. 16, and patent lace 
desk. Run a horizontal cord across top of desk. Cut threads 3 2 inches 



72 



BARBOURS PRIZE NEEDLE-WORK SERIES. 



long, double them, and knot on the cord. Run a single cord across 
desk i peg below the ist. Beginning at the left, carry each thread 
around this cord twice, allowing the threads to lie under the cord. 
This will form a horizontal rib. Now, run another horizontal cord 
across the desk 4 pegs below the last ; take the left thread, bring it 
diagonally across, twisting around lower cord, and fasten to side of 
desk, pass 7 threads or three knots, take right thread of next knot, 
and carry it diagonally to the left, fastening in same way. These 
threads form the " leaders." Taking each thread in succession, 
carry down, winding or twisting twice around each leader and the 
horizontal cord below. To fill the space between diamonds, link 

right thread in left. 
When this row is com- 
pleted, make 3 rows of 
Solomon's knots, an- 
other horizontal rib, 
then a row of linked 
picots, which consist of 
(ist) a row of Solo- 
mon's knots, drawn 
quite tight, then another 
row of the same, with 
space of thread between, 
and linking the left 
thread with right in 
making 2d knot. Make 
another horizontal rib, 
then Solomon's knots, 
graduated into points. 
The fringe may be tied 
in tassels or not, as liked. 
It will be seen that ex- 
tremely pretty and elab- 
orate designs may be 
made by a combination 
of very simple stitches. 

Ulster Fringe. J r 




BOBBIN WORK. 73 



ULSTER FRINGE. 



Fringe for a table-cover, scarf, or similar article may be easily 
knotted upon the material. A pretty table-cover recently observer! 
requires a yard square of denim (felt or other material may of course 
be substituted), Indian red being the color chosen. This was 
decorated in outline embroidery with shades 54 and 4%, Barbour's 
Ulster rope linen floss, and a fringe of the same colors completed the 
cover. Cut the threads 15 inches long, double them, pull the loop of 
each through the material, using a crochet hook for the purpose, and 
bringing the ends through the loop, draw it up. Two or three rows 
of Solomon's knots make a very pretty heading. These may be 
carried straight along or run into points. Many colors of the 
Ulster floss, left over from embroidery work, may be utilized for 
these fringes. 



PART 3. -BOBBIN WORK. 



BOBBIN WORK. 

This work, known also as " pillow " and " cushion " lace, we are 
glad to be able to introduce in a practical way to the thousands of 
ladies who possess the Prize Needle-Work Series, feeling sure it will 
prove a source of great pleasure, and, if desired, of profit. The 
work is of ancient origin, and in many parts of Europe forms the 
chief industry of the people, being produced in all varieties, from 
lace as filmy as a cobweb to that bobbined of the 3 -cord flax thread 
of coarsest numbers. In this connection it seems quite unnecessary 
to state that the flax thread alone is suitable for the work. Ladies 
who have used them know how far superior to cotton are " Irish flax 
crochet and lace threads," either in spools or balls, for knitting, 
crocheting, and like purposes ; for bobbin-work, however, it is not a 
question of superiority ; cotton is entirely unsuitable. 



74 



barbour's prize needle-work series, 



Many inquiries have been made from time to time in our own country 
concerning this work, none of which have as yet to our knowledge 
been satisfactorily answered. To make a beginning which will en- 
courage lovers of thread lace-work to undertake and eventually 




Bobbin Work. — Fig. i. 



become adepts in this beautiful art is the aim of the publishers, and 
all questions in regard to it, or materials for working, will be cheer- 
fully answered by the editor, provided, always, postage is inclosed 
for the purpose. 

Requirements for the work are not, of necessity, expensive. Fig. 
i shows a very convenient cushion of a pattern much used in 
Denmark, from which country the model came. This has an uphol- 
stered cylinder, much the shape of a large spool, which turns to 
allow the continuation of the pattern. The cushion-table, 15X19 
inches in size, is also padded and covered with suitable material, 
velvet or plush, finely embroidered, being frequently used for the 
purpose by ladies of leisure in European countries. 

A cushion (Fig. 2) which will answer every purpose, however, 
and which is universally used in many parts of Europe, may be more 
easily manufactured at home. It should be 11 inches in circum- 



BOBBIN WORK. 



75 



ference when completed, and need not be more than 9 or 10 inches 
long. Sew the material up the side, gather one end snugly, fit in 
a circle of stout pasteboard 1 1 inches around, stuff the cushion with 
curled hair, fine excelsior, or any suitable material easily penetrated 
by pins, making it as smooth and firm as possible, put in another 
pasteboard disc like the first, and draw up the end. This cushion 
may be placed in a wooden or pasteboard box of the right size, — 
weighted, if necessary — a basket or any suitable receptacle, which 
should be sufficiently heavy or secure to prevent tipping and moving 
about. The model lies in a little tray, tied at the ends, thus allow- 
ing it to be turned readily as the work proceeds. 

Bobbins are of different shapes and materials, being merely little 
spools with handles. They are usually of wood, although the " fine 
ladies " who do this work as a pastime frequently have them of 
ivory, carved. 

For ordinary work, large, well-pointed pins should be used; No. 10 




IARBOU8S PRIZE NEEQ1.E WORK BOOK NO- 3 



Bobbin Work. — Fig. 2. 



is a good size. For finer work, smaller pins may be chosen, but 
always sharp and having round heads to prevent hurting the fingers. 
Favorite patterns are made in the tint-cloth used for window- 
shades. These are perforated so that the work may be continuous, 
without moving the pattern. These perforations may be made with 
a large pin, as used in working, and should be carefully and evenly 
done, as on this the beauty of the lace much depends. In very fine 
patterns the perforating is done as the work proceeds. Cardboard 
or firm paper may be used for the patterns, in which case it is well 
to line them with thin muslin to prevent tearing. As the size of 



76 barbour's prize needle-work series. 

bobbins varies with the quality of lace, so do also the patterns, the 
holes in those for coarse lace being farther apart than for fine lace. 
To enlarge patterns, the checked " quadrille " paper is used ; it is 
not, however, necessary to enter into these details at present. 

A "winder" is quite necessary for one who intends to make a 
business of the work. Of these there are several kinds, consisting 
usually of a little stand with wooden wheel to be screwed to the 
table. The bobbins may be wound by hand, however, and when full 
a half- turn is taken to prevent the thread unwinding faster than 
wanted. After breaking the thread, take the bobbin in the right 
hand, make a loop around the left hand and put the bobbin up 
through this, forming a turn or catch near the top from which the 
thread pulls as required. 

The bobbins are tied together in one or more pairs, as directed, 
and slung on pins in the holes whose numbers are given. Two 
pairs of bobbins are used at once, and the pin put between and 
closed in by these two pairs as the work proceeds. To prevent 
complicating directions, we shall number the pairs according to the 
position occupied when used. The frequent drawing up and 
straightening out of the threads as the pins are put in will come 
naturally, with practice. The pins, which are continually removed 
from the preceding pattern as the work goes on, should be pushed 
in evenly and just deep enough to hold. 

The " stitches " in this lace are formed, as will be readily noted, 
of the crossings and twistings of bobbin threads. There is not the 
slightest difficulty in learning the work ; a little patience and prac- 
tice, as in netting, knitting, or crochet work, is all that is required. 
Beginning as we do in a practical way, we feel sure that bobbin- 
work will soon be floated on the high tide of popularity. 

GENERAL DIRECTIONS. 

Half-throw (ht) . — Pass the right bobbin of left pair over the 
left bobbin of right pair, then pass the right bobbins of each pair 
over left bobbins of same pair. 

Whole-throw (wt). — Repeat half-throw once. 



GROUNDS. 77 

Close. — Half- throw to close in the pin placed between two pairs 
of bobbins. 

Cross (c). — Pass right bobbin of left pair over left bobbin of 
right pair. 

Twist (tw). — Pass right bobbin of each pair over left of same 
pair. If but one of the two pairs is to be twisted this will be spec- 
ified, also the number of twists to be made. 

Cross, Twist, Cross (etc). — Cross (as above), twist both pairs 
once, and cross. 



GROUNDS. 



To form the " Diamond Point Edging " two simple grounds are 
used, those seen in many torchon laces, viz., " plain net" ground 
and " plain hole" ground. For the former, use pattern shown at 
fig. 3. Fasten this to cushion. Use 1 pair of bobbins to each pin 
across the top, tying the bobbins together and having the threads 
of uniform length and long enough to work nicely. This will be 
discovered by a little practice. . In the net shown 7 pairs are used, 
and these are numbered, beginning at the left. Let us state here 
that, for the sake of simplicity, this will always be done, each pair 
of bobbins being named according to the place it occupies upon 
the table at the time of working. Beginning at the right, take 7th 
pair in right and 6th in left hand, make 1 ht (see " General Direc- 
tions)." Putting aside 7th pair, ht with 5th and 6th ; put aside 
6th, ht with 4th and 5th; repeat across. After ht with 1st and 2d 
pairs, put pin in 1, between 1st and 2d pairs, and close with ht, 
using same pairs. Putting aside 1st, ht with 2d and 3d pairs, and 
so continue to the right, putting pin in 2, between 6th and 7th 
pairs, after ht with these. Continue until the work is as long as 
desired. In working a straight pattern like this, it is well to have 10 
or 12 pins on each side before beginning to take out the first 
ones. 

There are many varieties of " open net" or " hole " grounds. 
Of these the "plain hole" ground (pattern, fig. 4) is frequently 





Fig. 3- 



Plain Net Ground. 





Fig. 4. 



Plain Hole Ground. 



GROUNDS. 



79 



used. Six pairs of bobbins are required, 2 pairs being slung on 
each pin. Ht with 2d and 3d pair, pin in 1, close ; ht with 1st and 
2d pairs, pin in 2, close ; ht with 4th and 5th, pin in 3, close ; con- 
tinue in same way, putting pins in 4, 5, and 6 ; then ht with 5th and 
6th pairs, pin in 7, close, and repeat until the work is as long as 





Cloth Ground. 



Twisted Hole Ground. 



wanted. These grounds may be used as insertions, etc., and are 
very desirable. 

Close or " cloth ground" is so called because resembling woven 
linen in texture. Using 5 pairs of bobbins, pin in straight row of 
holes at top of pattern, 1 pair each in 3 left-hand holes, and 2 pairs 
in right-hand hole. (The pattern given for net ground may be 
used, adding an extra pair of bobbins, and the work is the same, 



80 harbour's prize needle-work series. 

save that an additional " cross " is made in the half-throw.) With 
4th and 5th pairs, cross, twist, and cross (etc) ; repeat across, pin 
in 1 st hole at side, etc with 1st and 2d pairs again, to close, work 
to right again, pin in 1st hole on opposite side, between 4th and 
5 th pairs, and continue indefinitely. 

In " twisted hole ground " the work is done in the same manner 
and with same pattern as plain hole ground, there being always an 
extra " twist " after the ordinary half- throw. The net is thus made 
stronger. Other grounds will be explained in future papers. The 
threads should occasionally be drawn up and straightened out, the 
worker taking a pair of bobbins in each hand, in order to ensure 
evenness and smoothness of the lace. This action will come 
naturally, after a little practice. 



DIAMOND POINT EDGING. 

Materials : Barbour's Irish flax crochet and lace thread, in balls, 
No. 50, or 3 -cord, 200-yards spools, 10 pairs of bobbins, cushion, 
and pattern (fig. 5). 

Fasten pattern around cushion, taking care that it matches ex- 
actly, in order that the work may be continuous. As patterns are 
furnished 1 1 inches in length, a plain space being allowed for lap- 
ping, the cushion should measure 1 1 inches in circumference. 

Tie 2 pairs of bobbins together, pin in n, same in 12, 1 pair at 
10, 18, 19, and 20, and 2 pairs at 21. 

The plain net point is first made. Beginning at the right, ht with 
9th and 10th pairs, pin in 1, close; ht with 8th and 9th, 7th and 
8th, 6th and 7 th, pin in 2, close ; ht with 7 th and 8th, 8th and 9th, 
9th and 10th, pin in 3, close. Working to left, take in 5th pair, 
making ht with 5th and 6th, then pin in 4, close; again, to right, 
put pin in 5 ; again to left, taking in 4th pair, putting pin in 6 ; to 
right, again, putting pin in 7. Now, to decrease the point, work to 
left, not using 4th pair, and putting pin in 8 ; to right, putting pin 
in 9 ; to left, not using 5th pair, pin in 10 ; to right, pin in 11 ; to 
left, pin in 1 2 ; after closing, ht with 8th and 9th pairs, put aside 



DIAMOND POINT EDGING. 



81 



7th, 8th, 9th, and 10th pairs, and proceed to make the plain hole 
ground above. 

Ht with 3d and 4th pairs, pin in 13, close (as always, with ht, 
unless specified). Wt with 2d and 3d pairs, thus making a strong 
edge, tw 1st pair, wt with 1st and 2d, then holding a pair in each 
hand draw the threads up tight and put pin in 14, closing with wt. 




Diamond Point Edging. 




Leave 1st, 2d, and 3d pairs at left, ht with 4th and 5th, pin in 15, 
close ; ht with 3d and 4th, pin in 16, close • wt with 2d and 3d, tw 
1st, wt with 1st and 2d, draw up as before, pin in 17, close withwt; 
leave 4 pairs at left, ht with 5th and 6th, pin in 18, close; ht with 
4th and 5 th, pin in 19, close ; ht with 3d and 4th, pin in 20, close ; 
wt with 2d and 3d, tw 1st, wt with 1st and 2d, draw up, pin in 21, 
close with wt. 



82 harbour's prize needle-work series. 

This completes the pattern. Repeat from beginning. The work 
will perhaps seem slow at first, but " practice makes perfect," and 
one is soon surprised to note the rapidity with which this pretty and 
durable lace is made. Once learned, the process seems mechanical, 
like the playing of a piano, and the work may be left at any time 
and taken up again readily. 



COPENHAGEN LACE. 

[Contributed by Mrs. Thomas Rowley, io Cameron St., Brookline, Mass.] 

Materials : Barbour's Irish flax crochet and lace thread, No. 50, 
in balls, or 3-cord, 200 yards spools, 15 pairs of bobbins, and pat- 
tern (fig. 6). 

Fasten pattern on cushion. Pin 4 pairs of bobbins at 43, 1 pair 
at 42, 41, 40, 39, 23, and 25, 3 pairs at 33, and 2 pairs at 34. 

Begin spider with 8th and 9th pairs, tw 4, etc ; with 7th and 8th 
(tw 7th 4 times) etc; with 6th and 7th (tw 6th 4 times) etc; with 
9th and 10th (tw 10th 4 times) etc; etc with 8th and 9th, 7th and 
8th, 6th and 7th; take 7th and 8th, draw up, pin in 1 (between 7th 
and 8th), close with etc; etc with 6th and 7th, 8th and 9th, 7th 
and 8th, 6th and 7th, 9th and 10th, 8th and 9th, 7th and 8th; tw 
6th 4 times, tw 5th, ht with 5th and 6th, pin in 2, close; ht with 
4th and 5th, pin in 3, close; etc with 3d and 4th, 2d and 3d; tw 
1 st twice, tw 2d, etc with 1st and 2d, pin in 4, close with etc, tw 2d, 
etc with 2d and 3d, 3d and 4th, tw 7th 4 times, ht with 6th and 7th, 
pin in 5, close; ht with 5th and 6th, pin in 6, close; ht with 4th 
and 5th, pin in 7, close; etc with 3d and 4th, 2d and 3d, tw 1st 
twice, etc with 1st and 2d, pin in 8, close with etc; etc with 2d 
and 3d, 3d and 4th, tw 8th 4 times, ht with 7th and 8th, pin in 9, close ; 
ht with 6th and 7th, pin in 10, close; ht with 5th and 6th, pin in 
11, close; ht with 4th and 5th, pin in 12, close; etc with 3d and 
4th, 2d and 3d ; tw 1st twice, etc with 1st and 2d, pin in 13, close 
with etc (remembering always, if you please, to twist 1st pair again 
before closing) ; etc with 2d and 3d, 3d and 4th; now, take 10th 
and nth, tw 10th 4 times, ht, pin in 14, close; tw 9th 4 times, ht 



COPENHAGEN LACE. 



83 



with 9th and 10th, pin at 15, close; ht with 10th and nth, nth 
and 1 2th, 12th and 13th, pin in 16, close; ht with nth and 12th, 





Copenhagen Lace. 



Fig. 6. 



10th and nth, 9th and 10th, 8th and 9th, pin in 17, close ; ht with 
9th and 10th, 10th and nth, nth and 12th, 12th and 13th, 13th 
and 14th, pin in 18, close; ht with 12th and 13th, nth and 12th, 
10th and nth, 9th and 10th, 8th and 9th, 7th and 8th, pin in 19, 
close; ht with 8th and 9th, 9th and 10th, 10th and nth, nth and 
1 2th, 12th and 13th, 13th and 14th, 14th and 15th, pin in 20, close ; 
htwith 13th and 14th, 12th and 13th, nth and 12th, 10th and nth, 



84 barbour's prize needle-work series. 

9th and 10th, 8th and 9th, pin in 21, close; work to right in same 
manner, putting pin in 22, between 13th and 14th, close; to left, 
putting pin in 23, between 9th and 10th, close ; to right, pin in 24, 
between 12th and 13th, close; to left, pin in 25, between 9th and 
10th, close; etc with nth and 12th, 12th and 13th; with 13th and 
14th, tw 2, etc; same with 14th and 15th, pin in 26, tw 2, close 
with etc; 13th and 14th, tw 2, etc; tw 13th twice, etc with 12th 
and 13th; etc with nth and 12th, pin in 27, close with etc; etc 
with 12th and 13th; with 13th and 14th, tw 2, etc; same with 14th 
and 15 th, pin in 28, tw 2, close with etc ; with 13th and 14th, tw 2, 
etc; tw 13th twice, etc with 12th and 13th; etc with nth and 12th, 
pin in 29, close with etc; work to right as previously directed in 
forming the scallop, putting pin in 30, between 14th and 15th; to 
left, again, pin in 31, between nth and 12th; to left, pin in 32, 
between 14th and 15th; to right, pin in 33, between nth and 12th; 
to right, pin in 34, between 14th and 15th; again to left, and put 
aside the 5 pairs of bobbins, having completed the scallop. 

Ht with 6th and 7th, pin in 35, close ; ht with 5th and 6th, pin 
in 36, close; ht with 4th and 5th, pin in 37, close; etc with 3d 
and 4th, 2d and 3d; tw 1st twice, etc with 1st and 2d, pin in 38, 
tw 1 st twice, close with etc; etc with 2d and 3d, 3d and 4th; ht 
with 7th and 8th, pin in 39, close ; ht with 6th and 7th, pin in 40, 
close; ht with 5th and 6th, pin in 41, close; ht with 4th and 5th, 
pin in 42, close; etc with 3d and 4th, 2d and 3d; tw 1st twice, 
etc with 1st and 2d, pin in 43, tw 1st twice, close with etc ; etc with 
2d and 3d, 3d and 4th. 

This completes the pattern. 



SPIDER INSERTION. 

Materials : Barbour's Irish flax crochet and lace thread, No. 40, in 
balls (or 3-cord, 200-yards spools), 16 pairs of bobbins, and pat- 
tern (fig. 7). 

After fastening pattern around cushion, pin 3 pairs of bobbins at 
11, 1 pair each at 10, 8, 9, 7, 4, 14, 17, 19, 18, and 20, and 3 at 21. 



SPIDER INSERTION. 



85 



Beginning with the spider, take 8th and 9th pairs, tw 2, etc ; 7th 
and 8th, tw 7th twice, etc; tw 10th twice, etc with 9th and 10th; 
etc with 8th and 9th, pin in 1, close with etc ; 7 th and 8th, etc ; 8th 
and 9th, etc ; tw 7th twice, ht with 6th and 7th, pin in 2, close ; ht 
with 5th and 6th ; ht with 4th and 5 th, pin in 3, close ; ht with 5th 
and 6th; ht with 6th and 7th; tw 8th twice, ht with 7th and 8th, 
pin in 4, close ; ht with 6th and 7th, 5th and 6th, 4th and 5 th, 3d 




Spider Insertion. — Fig. 7. 



and 4th, pin in 5, close ; wt with 2d and 3d, tw 1st twice, ht with 
1 st and 2d, pin in 6, close ; wt with 2d and 3d, ht with 4th and 5th, 
5th and 6th, 6th and 7th, pin in 7, close; ht with 5th and 6th, 4th 
and 5th, pin in 8, close; ht with 5th and 6th, pin in 9, close; ht 
with 4th and 5th, 3d and 4th, pin in 10, close ; wt with 2d and 3d, 
tw 1 st twice, ht with 1st and 2d, pin in 11, close; wt with 2d and 
3d, ht with 4th and 5th, 5th and 6th; putting these aside, begin 
with 10th and nth, tw 10th twice, ht with same pairs, pin in 12, 



86 barbour's prize needle-work series. 

close; ht with nth and 12th, 12th and 13th, 13th and 14th, pin in 
13, close; ht with nth and 12th, 10th and nth, tw 9th twice, ht 
with 9th and 10th, pin in 14, close; ht with nth and 12th, 12th 




Spider Insertion. 

and 13th, 13th and 14th, pin in 15, close; wt with 14th and 15th, 
tw 1 6th twice, ht with 15th and 16th, pin in 16, close ; wt with 14th 
and 15th, ht with 12th and 13th, nth and 12th, 10th and nth, pin 
in 17, close ; ht with nth and 12th, 12th and 13th, pin in 18, close ; 
htwith nth and 12th, pin in 19, close; ht with 12th and 13th, 13th 
and 14th, pin in 20, close; wt with 14th and 15th, tw 16th twice; 
ht with 15th and 16th, pin in 21, close; wt with 14th and 15th. 
Repeat from beginning. 



DEPARTMENT 4. 



CROSS-STITCH FOR GINGHAM. 

PRIZE ARTICLE. 

[Contributed by Ruth Strattox, West Medway, Mass.] 

Use either Barbour's Irish flax crochet and lace thread, No. 25, 
in balls or spools, or linen floss, size a. 




Cross-Stitch for Gingham. 



Work over the dark squares as shown in design. This is an 
original pattern, simple, but very effective. 



88 



BARBOUR S PRIZE NEEDLE-WORK SERIES. 



DARNED NET APRON. 

PRIZE ARTICLE. 

[Contributed by J. Florence Caplin, 408 South Ninth St., Minneapolis, Minn.] 

Materials : i^ yards cotton brussels net, £ yard wide, and 2 skeins 
Barbour's white floss, size aa. 

Cut the net into 2 parts, one 25 inches for the body of the apron, 




Fig. i, 



DARNED NET APRON. 



89 



the other 29 inches, for ruffle and strings ; the latter to be cut in 
lengths 6 inches wide. 




Fig. 2. 



No knots are used, and there is no wrong side. Begin the sides 
of the apron 2\ inches from the bottom, and let the work extend to 
within 3 inches of the top. The number of repetitions depends on 
the fineness of the meshes, and the size of the apron. In the model 
the design (Fig. 1) was repeated 7 times. Be sure that the sides 



90 



BARBOUR S PRIZE NEEDLE-WORK SERIES. 



both begin the same number of rows from the bottom. The 2 
rows of stars at the bottom of the design extend in regular order 
across the apron, and it is well to work these after darning one side, 
so as to get them to come in the right places. 




Fig. 3. 



The edges of the strings are turned down once and finished by 
running 2 parallel threads of floss through them. A deeper hem is 
turned in the same way at the ends of the strings, and finished with 
3 zigzag rows of floss. 

The ruffle (Fig. 2) is worked across, beginning with the lowest 
row. In cutting the points, use carefully a small, sharp pair of scis- 
sors, leaving a row of meshes below the lowest thread. The head- 
ing is finished with parallel threads, like the edges of strings, and 
drawn up sufficiently to fit the apron, to which it is sewn with fine 
white flax thread. The edge should not be cut until the lace is 
complete. 

The frill or heading of the apron is f inch wide, and shirred 
with 3 parallel rows of the floss, drawn up to gather it sufficiently. 
The strings are then sewed on. 

The lace is extremely pretty for trimming drapes or anything of 
the kind. If desired, colored floss, size 8 or 00, may be used for 
darning for this purpose. 

This work is coming into more decided favor, the lace being 



DARNED NET DRAPE. 



91 



dainty, durable, and not at all difficult. A new filling-in-stitch (Fig. 
3) is showy and particularly simple. Allow me to say that I find 
Barbour's linen floss, size aa, or according to size of mesh, especially 
adapted to this work. 



DARNED NET DRAPE. 

PRIZE ARTICLE. 

[Contributed by Miss Eibbie M. Fisk, 14S Center St., Chicago, 111.] 

Materials : i spool Barbour's ecru flax thread, No. 50, 3-cord, 200- 
yards spools, and 1 yard brussels net or bobinet lace, or ij yards 
if a longer scarf is preferred. 




Darned Net Drape. 



Turn a half-inch hem, folding down once, on each side of the 
scarf, baste in place, and work a narrow pattern to hold in place. 
That shown in the model is very pretty and simple, and is taken 



92 barbour's prize needle-work series. 

half on and half off the hem. The edge of each end is cut in 
points and buttonholed. 

It is quite unnecessary, even were it possible, to give minute di- 
rections for this work, as the design is copied from illustration. 
The pattern is very simple, although so effective, and may be read- 
ily followed. It is desirable for numerous articles, such as spreads, 
shams, etc. 

The drape may be lined with colored silk in some delicate shade 
with good effect, and the Irish floss used instead of the ecru spool 
thread. I like the latter particularly ; while possessing a silkiness 
of finish, it also has the little stiffness which gives a sort of "body" 
to the work, and laundering but adds to its beauty. A drape of 
black net darned with pink floss, No. 8, is very effective, and doubt- 
less many ideas for using the same will present themselves to work- 
ers in this line. 



DEPARTMENT 5. 



BAG IN OUTLINE EMBROIDERY. 

PRIZE ARTICLE. 

[Contributed by Mrs. G. L. Cooper, 240 E. Main St., Meriden, Conn.] 

Materials: y^ yard of heavy old-rose linen, 32 inches wide, 1 
skein each of Barbour's rope-linen floss, size o, shades 94, 52, 57, 
and 100, and 1 spool ecru flax thread, No. 40. 

Outline embroidery of this style is rapidly and effectively done by 
the aid of the sewing-machine. It is especially desirable where 
striking effects are sought for at a trifling expenditure of time. 

The design is first stamped or sketched m the usual way, then a 
dozen thicknesses of newspaper are basted to the under side of the 
fabric, and the pattern outlined with the sewing-machine, the stitch- 
ing being done on the right side. For this use the flax machine 
thread. The chain-stitch machine gives best results, the stitch 
used being as long as possible, that the paper may be readily re- 
moved and leave the work loose. With a stiletto or coarse needle 
proceed to draw up into a loop every alternate stitch, leaving them 
standing on the right side of the work as a foundation for the 
embroidery proper. For the heavy stems use No. 100, simply 
catching together opposite loops of the raised stitching and produc- 
ing a rope-like or couching effect. One or more strands of the 
floss may be laid between these rows of stitching, and held in place 
by the connecting thread. This will give greater thickness and 
prominence to the stems. For the leaves, start at the base of a 
petal, using No. 94, and buttonhole-stitch each loop of one side 
toward the centre of the petal \ return, drawing each loop of the 
opposite side also inward, but instead of taking the stitches into the 
fabric^ catch them into those already formed, thus giving the work 



94 



BARBOUR S PRIZE NEEDLE-WORK SERIES. 



a raised appearance. This will entirely fill a long, narrow petal or 
leaf, and is quickly done. Where the design calls for broad leaves 




BABBOURS PRIZE NEEDLE WOBKDOOK NO -3 



Bag - in Outline Embroidery. 



or petals, fine effects are produced by covering the space with 
parallel rows of stitching, about half an inch apart. The loops are 



BUTTERCUP DOILY. 95 

then drawn up and opposite ones caught together and secured by a 
French knot (directions for making which are given in book No. i), 
or by a cross-stitch. The petals of the flowers in the design are 
w r orked with No. 52, the long stamens between petals with shade 57, 
and the centre with shade 100. The base of the thistle is worked 
with No. 100, and top with No. 57. Vines and mosses are well 
represented by stitching in long, curving lines, drawing up the loops 
and securing them alternately in opposite directions, with stitches 
graduated in length from half an inch at base of the stem to the 
shortest possible at the top. Leaves may be simply outlined by the 
stitching, and each loop held down by quarter-inch stitches with 
the heavy floss, these stitches following the curve of the leaf and all 
pointing outward. In veining the leaves the loops may be alter- 
nately held down in opposite directions. When completed, dampen, 
press on thick flannel from the wrong side, face the bag down with 
silk to match, and make draw-strings of old-rose ribbon, No. 7. 

This embroidery is particularly applicable to denim, for table- 
covers, etc. 



BUTTERCUP DOILY. 

PRIZE ARTICLE, 

[Contributed by Elise Juxgbluth, Box 171, Beaufort, S.C.] 

Materials : 12 -inch square embroidery linen, Barbour's embroidery 
floss, size 8, 1 skein each of Nos. 50, 69, 75, 57, 64, and 2. 

Draw 1 st thread 1^ inch from outer edge of square, draw 4 more, 
leave 4, and draw 5 ; then with No. 2 floss pin-stitch this edge for a 
fringe. The stems and leaves are worked w r ith No. 50, sepals No. 
50, streaked with 69. Flowers are worked in solid Kensington. In 
full flower, 1 petal should be No. 75, and all turned edges of petals, 
opposite petals No. 57, other petals of No. 64, also centre of French 
knots, with a few of No. 75. The half-flower should have No. 57 
for side petals and No. 75 for full petals. Stamens of spent flowers 
are of No. 75, French knots of No. 64, and 3 French knots of same 
for centres. 



96 



barbour's prize needle-work series 



The set of i 2 doilies which received ist prize in Department 7 
were all of different design. For white daisies, 1 skein each of the 
floss, Nos. 2, 69, 50, and 57 ; stems outlined with No. 69, leaves 
and calyx of No. 50, worked in long and short stitch; petals, solid, 




Buttercup Doily. 



with No. 2, and centres filled in with French knots, No. 57. For 
purple asters Nos. 61, 50, 69, and 57 are required, the veins of 
leaves and stems being outlined with No. 69, leaves and calyx 
worked with No. 50, with a few stitches of No. 69 in each calyx, 
centres of French knots in No. 57, and petals outlined with No. 61. 



EGLANTINE CENTRE-PIECE. 97 

Petals may also be worked in bird's-eye stitch. The flax embroidery 
floss is unsurpassed for lustre and beauty of coloring. 

The round doilies are much in favor just now, and are easily 
fringed when one knows how. Take a 12 -inch square of linen (or 
according to the size wanted), mark upon this a perfect circle as 
large as possible, then another circle an inch within. Around this 
stitch with the sewing machine, using very fine thread with very 
short stitch. After having embroidered the centre as described, 
buttonhole-stitch over the stitched line with Barbour's embroidery 
floss, No. 2, size 8, cut around the outer line, and draw the fringe by 
beginning on one side next the stitched line. Draw the threads to 
the edge on all 4 sides, which will leave 4 triangles ■ pull the threads 
in these 1 at a time, from the stitched line, using a pin, straighten 
out and even the fringe, and the work is done. 



EGLANTINE CENTRE-PIECE. 

PRIZE ARTICLE. 

[Contributed by Mathilde E. Jones, Beaufort, S.C.] 

Materials : 25 inches square of fine linen, and size 8 Barbour's 
flax embroidery thread, 3 skeins each Nos. 190 and 80, 2 skeins of 
63 for petals of flowers, 3 skeins each of Nos. 50 and 69 for leaves, 
2 skeins of No. 100 for scrolls, veins of leaves, and sepals, and 1 
skein each of Nos. 75 and 57 for centre of flowers. 

Draw 5 threads 3 inches from edge of linen. Leave 4, draw out 
5 again. Work this in fagoting or ordinary hemstitch, using No. 
80 Barbour's flax thread, white, 3 -cord, 200-yards spools. In draw- 
ing the threads let the 1st be 3 inches from edge of linen, the rest 
drawn towards outer edge. Stitches used are half-Kensington, out- 
line, satin-stitch, and French knots. When completed, the fringe 
is drawn. 

Having marked or stamped the design, proceed to work stems, 
veins of leaves, scrolls, and sepals in outline, using No. 100; leaves 
near flowers, alternate, No, 50 and No. 69 — on the scrolls the 



98 



barbour's prize needle-work series 



larger with No. 50 and the smaller with No. 69. Of the large cor. 
ner flowers, the 3 small centre petals are worked in No. 63, 2 top 
petals nearest bud in No. 80, and 3 lower petals in No. 190. In 
the small corner flowers, the 2 petals nearest corner are worked 




Eglantine Centre-Piece. 



with No. 190, the petal encroaching on the leaf and that directly 
opposite in No. 80, and the upper petal nearest the scroll in No. 
63. Of the flower in centre of scroll, the 2 small upper petals 
nearest scroll are worked in No. 80, the large centre petal, large 



EGLANTINE CENTRE-PIECE. 99 

lower petal, and the upper one touching all of the 3 green leaves in 
No. 190, the half-petal touching green leaf on right and upper petal 
touching green leaf on left of flower in No. 63, the petal coming 
between the dark upper and light lower petal in No. 80. To work 
the bud, upper half-petal on right in No. 6$, upper petal opposite 
in No. 80, 2 lower petals in No. 190. The little round centres of 
the open flowers are satin-stitched in No. 75, the stamens outlined 
in same, with French knot of No. 57 at the top. Directions for 
stitches used will be found in No. 1 of the Prize Series. 



DEPARTMENT 6. 



CENTRE-PIECE IN OLD ENGLISH POINT. 

PRIZE ARTICUE. 

[Contributed by Anna S. Converse, So. Worthington, Mass.] 

Materials, 3 dozen yards linen hem-stitch braid, 1 spool No. 100 
and 2 spools No. 30 Barbour's flax thread, 3-cord, 200-yards spools, 
and a sewing needle large enough to carry threads without fraying. 

This work is becoming extensively known as one of the modern 
laces of America, and is noted both for its beauty and durability for 
table and furniture decoration. The illustrated centre-piece shows 
one of the many unique and beautiful designs used, the arrangement 
of design and stitches being original. A design should first be 
placed over plain wrapping paper to keep work smooth while in prog- 
ress. The braid is then basted closely on the design, and all 
curves whipped with the No. 100 thread to bring them to the out- 
line desired. All ends are neatly and securely fastened on the 
upper side, as the worker must bear in mind that the work is wrong 
side up while in progress. For the ground-work, also for the filling 
of flowers, the No. 30 thread is used in a variety of stitches, as may 
be seen in illustration. One need not be confined to the use of 
any particular stitches, choosing those which are effective and serve 
the purpose desired. For those desiring more explicit directions, 
will say that the upper portions of the lily are filled with sorrento 
bars and wheels, which are formed by passing the thread through 
the length of space, twisting back on the thread twice ; carry the 
thread across each way and twist back to centre, then work over and 
under the bars, forming the wheel ; repeat through space. Corre- 
sponding spaces in lower part of lily are filled in the same way. 



CENTRE-PIECE IN OLD ENGLISH POINT, 



101 



The centre petal is filled with " Point Grecque " bars, which are 
formed by carrying thread from top of petal to point, twisting back 




Centre-Piece in Old English Point. 



twice; then place across bars a little inclined, and fasten at centre 
with stitch or knot ; repeat. The side petals of same figure are 
filled with plain cross-stitch, also all small leaves throughout the design. 
The petals of roses are filled with cross-stitch and sorrento bars and 
wheels, in alternation. The heart of each rose is filled with " Point 
de Bruxelles " and " Point de Venice" stitches in alternate rows. 
First work a plain buttonhole-stitch from right to left, then work back 



102 barbour's prize needle-work series. 

a loose buttonhole-stitch, in which work three buttonhole-stitches, 
closely drawn up \ repeat. 

The ground- work connecting all figures is composed of " Raleigh " 
bars and picots, which are formed by passing thread three times from 
point to point, and working over them plain buttonhole-stitch, 
closely drawn ; the picots are formed by passing the needle point 
through stitch on bar, wind thread around needle ten times, press 
thumb tightly on this, and draw the needle and thread through the 
twists. The little rings in each corner which form a centre for 
connecting bars are made by winding thread around a pencil or tiny 
cork ten times and covering with close buttonhole-stitches. These 
are basted down wrong side up on design before putting in bars. 

The work is then removed from design and the hem-stitched linen 
centre inserted by overhanding on to edges of braid, using No. 100 
thread. The beauty of the work is much enhanced by pinning 
down on sheet, and pressing with hot iron over damp cloths. 



HANDKERCHIEF IN PRINCESS LACE. 

PRIZE ARTICLE. 

[Contributed by Lillian E. Converse, South Worthington, Mass.] 

Materials, 6 yards honiton leaf braid, 5 yards plain point lace 
braid, and 21-2 yards picot braid, with Barbour's flax thread, No. 
100, 3-cord, 200-yards spools, or white embroidery floss, No. 8. 
Use a sewing needle large enough to carry thread without wearing. 

The princess lace (also known as duchess lace) results in com- 
bining the honiton and point lace braids in one design, and in that 
given will be seen a dainty specimen. The braids should be basted 
upon the design closely, the curves whipped to bring them in 
proper outline, the braids sewed neatly together and ends securely 
fastened, especially where the leaf braid is cut apart. The connec- 
ing links are sorrento, or twisted bars, and spiders formed by weav- 
ing over and under the bars, except in the centre of each corner 
figure, wherein are placed back-stitch wheels. The long narrow 
space between the plain point lace braids, passing around the de- 



HANDKERCHIEF IN PRINCESS LACE. 



108 



sign, is filled by working point de Bruxelles stitches (plain button- 
hole-stitches) along one side of braid, then on the other side make 
one point de Bruxelles stitch on braid, with a long point de Brux- 




Handkerchief in Princess Lace. 



elles stitch on opposite side, also a close Bruxelles stitch in next 
stitch on same side, and fill the long stitch of previous row with 
close Bruxelles stitches ; repeat. 

The edge is finished with the dainty picot braid. The lace can 
now be taken from design and the fine lawn centre inserted. 



104 



BARBOUR S PRIZE NEEDLE-WORK SERIES. 



HEDEBOE LACE. 

[Contributed by J. Marie Howley, io Cameron St., Brookline, Mass.] 

Materials : Barbour's Irish flax lace and crochet thread, Xo. 50, 
in balls (or 3-cord, 200-yards spools), a smooth wooden pin or 

pencil about the size of one's linger, and a sewing-needle large 
enough to carry the thread. 



^^^VAnrYYVvvi 


JP^^*' 4l 5 J i 


III 1 1- |M | 1 | 




V^sdM 


| J v IK %*« 






N**n 





Hedeboe Lace. 



This work, so -called from the town in Denmark where it origi- 
nated, is very showy and durable, and adapted to a wide variety of 
uses. It is very popular with the royal family. 

The pattern shows a section of a collar, and is one of the simplest 
combinations of the rings with lace stitches. Wind thread around 
pin 15 times, slip off, work around ring with close buttonhole-stitch, 
join 1 st to last, turn, work back oyer 16 sts in open buttonhole, 8 in 
all, missing every other st and leaving a little loop of thread be- 
tween, that is, not drawing thread up tight. Next row of point, 



HEDEBOE LACE. 105 

work under each loop, 7 in all, then 6, etc., till point is formed. 
Break thread, fastening neatly and securely. Make another ring in 
same way, joining to 1st by catching in 2 or 3 sts on side; con- 
tinue till you have a circle of eight rings, points coming inside, then 
fill the centre with a sorrento wheel or " spider," catching the thread 
from point to point, and weaving around where crossed. On out- 
side begin by making a point on a ring, same as inner ones were 
made ■ then to make the point between rings, catch the thread 
across to next ring, go back and forth 6 times in all, work over in 
close buttonhole, turn, miss 2 sts, make 7 open sts, form a point as 
before ; make next point on wheel, carry thread back to preceding 
point 6 times in all, work over it, and so continue. Make as many 
wheels as wanted. To join together, begin between 2 corresponding 
rings, draw wheels nearly together, and fill space with twisted sts, 
same as open sts, but making loops larger and putting needle twice 
through. For the heading, make a row of open spaces, same as 
rings were formed, working back to form points. Then fasten thread 
in 1 st point, go back and forth from 2d 6 threads, work over it, and 
repeat across. 

Entire centre-pieces are made of this lace, and a great variety of 
lace stitches used with the rings in forming different patterns. Only 
the flax threads should be used, however, as cotton is too hard and 
lustreless. 



LUNCH NAPKINS. 

PRIZE ARTICLE. 

[Contributed by C. B. Fitch, 5S Olive St., New Haven, Conn.] 

Materials : Barbour's flax thread, No. 70, 3-cord, 200-yards spools, 
and \ yard square of round-thread linen for each napkin. 

Draw a few threads all around the napkins 2 inches from the edge, 
and hemstitch it for the fringe. One-half inch from this draw out 
the threads for \ inch, fold the napkin into an even quarter, and 
measuring \ inch from the folds, draw out the threads for the space 



106 



barbour's prize needle-work series, 



of inch to form a square with the threads already drawn in 
the corner. For No. i, quarter the square thus made with a half- 
inch band of drawn threads, and work as shown. For No. 2, the 
corner square is divided into 9 small squares, and any design in 
heavy work maybe made in each little square, or in the 5, as in illus- 




Lunch Napkin. — No. i. 



tration. It is easy to design different corners, which may be more 
or less elaborate, and 6 of these, with different corner-designs, make 
a beautiful set. A handsome lunch-cloth to match the set may be 



LUNCH NAPKINS. 



107 




Lunch Napkin. — Xo. 2. 



made with a large square of linen, following out the design of one of 
the napkins. These are easily laundried and wear well, never chang- 



ing color in washing, as does silk work, 



BARBOUR'S 



ULSTER ROPE LINEN FLOSS 

is continually and rapidly advancing in popularity as its perfect 
adaptability to the varied uses of expensive silks becomes more 
strongly attested. Its smoothness and lustre is unsurpassed. It 
is especially adapted for Embroidery, for the decoration of a 
thousand and one articles for home use and adornment, and with 
equally as charming effect can be applied as readily to the uses of 
Knotting, Netting, Knitting, Crocheting and kindred arts. For 
Slippers, Mittens, Parses, etc. it is durable, lustrous, firm, and 
far less expensive than silk, and its sale in this new field is 
constantly increasing. 

58 Colors are now on the market including the Newest Art 
Shades, and the old favorites ; others will be added as approved. 

Ask your Dealer for 

BARBOUR'S ULSTER ROPE LINEN FLOSS. 



TO WASH EMBROIDERY. 



Make a light suds with pure castile soap and (particularly for 
the first laundering) cool water. Wash one article at a time, 
finishing with this before taking another. Do not rub the 
embroidery, or put soap directly upon it. Rinse carefully and 
quickly in clear, cold water to which a little salt may be added. 
After rinsing, place between two thick towels, or in one which 
may be folded over, roll up, squeeze (in order to extract the 
moisture) , then unroll, place right side down on a soft cloth or 
flannel folded in several thicknesses, lay a white cloth over the 
wrong side, and press until dry with a moderately hot iron. 



Established 1784. 



jrtek for 2Bcu$our'£, 

*3t w tf>e Uzi for oil \m& 

Snstef upon ^aftit^ if, 

See that the threads you purchase bear labels similar to 
the following, THEY ABE STANDARD, 



3-CORD 200 YARDS SPOOL THREAD. 




TOP LABEL. 



IN 

DARK BLUE, for strong Sewing 
WHITE, For 

WD, BROWN, We Making 

(Ecru ) and 

DRABS, Needlework. 



BALL THREAD 




REVERSE LABEL. 



COLORS. 



GREY, WHITE $ ECRU. 
I Oz. Balls. 




SIZES 



LINEN FLOSSES 
In all the Art Shades, 



'BADE W'LAWMAftH 


ROPE LINEN FLOSS. 

The Barbour Brothers Co. 

NEW YORK. 


Size oo 
SHADE 

N° 3 



Sizes, No. 8, Finest. No. 00, Medium, 
No. 0, C&arsest. 



NOS. 16 TO 70. 
(No. 70 Fine Size.) 



BARBOUR'S STANDARD 
3-Cord Carpet Thread. 

jf BARBOURS' IRISH FLAX. % 

IN ALL COLORS. 



3#fe for Barbour'* 



Barbour's Irish linen Threads 



k 

Are made for every branch of trade, and for every purpose where 
Linen Threads are used. They are specially adapted for all hinds of 
machine and hand work in 

Boot and Shoe Making, 

Clothing Manufacturing, 

Carpet Sewing 
Harness Making, 

Book Binding, 

Glove Making, 

Fish Nets. 



Spool, Ball, and Skein Threads 

IN ALL COLORS. 

For all kinds of coarse, strong sewing, and fine stitching, and for 
every kind of Art Needlework with Linen. : 



For sale by all respectable wholesale dry goods jobbing houses, 
shoe findings and saddlery hardware dealers throughout the country. 

At retail by all small-ware dealers, general stores, carpet houses, 
and shoe findings dealers. 



^sk iov l&avbouv's. 



y Established 1784 




5 or 



STRENGTH AND DURABILITY, 



B 



ARBOUR'S IRISH LINEN THREAD 



5 S - 



THE BEST FOR ALL USES. 



Received Highest Awards at World's Fair, Chicago, 1893. 
SPECIAL MERITS 

DISTINGUISHED EXCELLENCE. UNIFORMITY. STRENGTH- 

ADAPTABILITY. DURABILITY. 



Barbour's Threads receive Highest Awards wherever Exhibited. 



S^tak for BctrBoinfo 



HIGHEST AWARD - WORLD'S FAIR 
ESTABLISHED 1784. 



1893, 



Gold Medal Threads are the Best. *§f Read the Record of Highest Awards. 




BARBOUR'S THREADS teIWKa* A CENTURY. 



THREAD WORKS: 
PATERSON, NEW JERSEY. LISBURN, IRELAND. OTTENSEN, GERMANY. 



STORES : 

New York, 218 Church St. Boston, 58 South St. 

Chicago, 108 & 110 Franklin St. St. Louis, 814 Lucas Ave. 

San Francisco, 517 & 519 Market St. 

Also in London, Manchester, Glasgow, Dublin, Paris, Hamburg, Montreal, Melbourne, 
Sydney, Brussels, Amsterdam, Madrid, Milan and Naples. 

Forming collectively a Flax Thread industry employing jooo persons or as large as any 

two other Linen Thread firms, 

ASK FOR BARBOUR'S. INSIST UPON HAVIN6 IT. SOLD EVERYWHERE. 



BARBOUR'S IRISH FLAX THREADS 



Received Highest Awards at the World's Fair, 1893 

■E! 

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STERLING & FRANCINE CLARK ART INSTITUTE 

NK9100 .B7 v.3 stack 

Bradford, Mary E./A treatise on lace-mak 




SPECIAL MERITS. 

Strength, GbaptaGifitij, ^uta&i-fttw-. 




THE BARBOUR BROTHERS COMPANY. 



NEW YORK, 218 CHURCH ST. 



Boston, 58 South St. Chicago, 108 & 110 Franklin St. 
San Francisco, 517 & 519 Market St. St. Louis, 814 Lucas Ave. 





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Barbour's Calendar 



Size 53k, x 8 in. 



. . For 1896 . . 

Sent on receipt of Two 2 -Cent Stamps. 



This Calendar, of which the above illustration is a 
small and partial reproduction, is a remarkable product 
of the Lithographers' Art— in bright colors — appro- 
priate to the figure. 

Barbour's L.itliog'raplis (Dolls — 12 for three 2- 
cent stamps — Yachts —10 for four 2-cent stamps) are 
already famous. The Calendar will be an unusually 
attractive ornament to anv room. 



BARBOUR'S 

Prize Needlework Series, 

No. 4. 

'Just Issued.) 150 Pages. Profusely 

Illustrated. Books 1, 2 and 3 

still in print. 

Mailed to air^ address for 

10 Cents each. 

THE BARBOUR BROS. CO., 

218 Church Street, New York. 
















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Barbour's Calendar 

. . For 1896 . . 

Size 5> 2 x8in. Sent on receipt of Two 2-Cent Stamps. 

This Calendar, of which the above illustration is a 
small and partial reproduction, is a remarkable product 
of the Lithographers' Art— in bright colors — appro- 
priate to the figure. 

Barbour's Litlio graphs (Dolls — 12 for three 2- 
cent stamps — Yachts —10 for four 2-cent stamps) are 
already f anions. The Calendar will be an unusually 
attractive ornament to any room. 



BARBOUR'S 

Prize Needlework Series, 

No. 4. 

Just Issued."! 150 Pages. Profusely 

Illustrated. Books 1, 2 and 3 

still in print. 

Mailed to any address for 

10 Cents each. 

THE BARBOUR BROS. CO., 

218 Church Street, New York. 




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Barbour's Irish Flax Threads 

AND 

Barbour's Ulster Floss 

ARE CARRIED IN STOCK BY ALL THE LEAD- 
ING RETAILERS OF 

Art Needlework Supplies. 



Should you have trouble in obtaining our Threads 
or Flosses wi. to 



THE BARBOUR BROTHERS COMPANY. 



New York, 



Boston, 



Chicago. St. Louis. Cincinnati. San Francisco. 



Explanation of Terms and Abbrevations used in Barbour's Prize Needlework Series. 



TERMS USED IN KNITTING. 

K, Knit plain. 

O, Over ; thread over needle, forming an extra stitch. O 2, over twice. 

N, narrow; knit two stitches together. 

P, Purl (or seam); knit with thread before needle. 

SI, n and b, slip, narrow and bind ; slip first stitch, narrow next two, and draw 
slipped stitch over. 

SI and b, slip and bind; same as si, n and b, omitting the narrowing. To cast 
or bind off, continue the process. 

Stars and parentheses indicate repetition; thus, * o 2, n, repeat from * twice, 
and (o 2, n,) 3 times, mean the same as o 2, n, o 2, n, o 2, n. 



TERMS USED IN CROCHETING. 

Ch. chain; a straight series of loops, each drawn with the hock through the 
one preceding it. 

Sc, single crochet; hook through work, thread over and draw through work 
and stitch on hook at same time. 

Dc, double crochet; hook through work, thread over, and draw through, over, 
and draw through two stitches on hook. 

Tc, treble crochet; over, draw thread through work, over, draw through two 
stitches on hook, over, and draw through remaining two. 

Stc, short treble crochet ; like treble, save that the thread is drawn through 
the three stitches at once. 

Dtc, double treble crochet; thread over twice before insertion of hook in work, 
then proceed as in treble crochet. 

P, picot; a loop of chain joined by catching in first stitch of chain. 
Complete illustrated directions for these stitches are given in No. 1 of the Prize 
Series. 



See 



That all your %\ X 
Linen Thread 

carries this Trade-Mark. 




Barbour's Ulster Rope Linen Floss non made in 75 shades. Ask your dealer for it, 



-% J A/ 



5